Aesop's Fables; a new translation eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 119 pages of information about Aesop's Fables; a new translation.

THE LION AND THE BULL

A Lion saw a fine fat Bull pasturing among a herd of cattle and cast about for some means of getting him into his clutches; so he sent him word that he was sacrificing a sheep, and asked if he would do him the honour of dining with him.  The Bull accepted the invitation, but, on arriving at the Lion’s den, he saw a great array of saucepans and spits, but no sign of a sheep; so he turned on his heel and walked quietly away.  The Lion called after him in an injured tone to ask the reason, and the Bull turned round and said, “I have reason enough.  When I saw all your preparations it struck me at once that the victim was to be a Bull and not a sheep.”

    The net is spread in vain in sight of the bird.

THE WOLF, THE FOX, AND THE APE

A Wolf charged a Fox with theft, which he denied, and the case was brought before an Ape to be tried.  When he had heard the evidence on both sides, the Ape gave judgment as follows:  “I do not think,” he said, “that you, O Wolf, ever lost what you claim; but all the same I believe that you, Fox, are guilty of the theft, in spite of all your denials.”

    The dishonest get no credit, even if they act honestly.

THE EAGLE AND THE COCKS

There were two Cocks in the same farmyard, and they fought to decide who should be master.  When the fight was over, the beaten one went and hid himself in a dark corner; while the victor flew up on to the roof of the stables and crowed lustily.  But an Eagle espied him from high up in the sky, and swooped down and carried him off.  Forthwith the other Cock came out of his corner and ruled the roost without a rival.

    Pride comes before a fall.

THE ESCAPED JACKDAW

A Man caught a Jackdaw and tied a piece of string to one of its legs, and then gave it to his children for a pet.  But the Jackdaw didn’t at all like having to live with people; so, after a while, when he seemed to have become fairly tame and they didn’t watch him so closely, he slipped away and flew back to his old haunts.  Unfortunately, the string was still on his leg, and before long it got entangled in the branches of a tree and the Jackdaw couldn’t get free, try as he would.  He saw it was all up with him, and cried in despair, “Alas, in gaining my freedom I have lost my life.”

THE FARMER AND THE FOX

A Farmer was greatly annoyed by a Fox, which came prowling about his yard at night and carried off his fowls.  So he set a trap for him and caught him; and in order to be revenged upon him, he tied a bunch of tow to his tail and set fire to it and let him go.  As ill-luck would have it, however, the Fox made straight for the fields where the corn was standing ripe and ready for cutting.  It quickly caught fire and was all burnt up, and the Farmer lost all his harvest.

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Project Gutenberg
Aesop's Fables; a new translation from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.