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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 119 pages of information about Aesop's Fables; a new translation.

A Lion and an Ass set up as partners and went a-hunting together.  In course of time they came to a cave in which there were a number of wild goats.  The Lion took up his stand at the mouth of the cave, and waited for them to come out; while the Ass went inside and brayed for all he was worth in order to frighten them out into the open.  The Lion struck them down one by one as they appeared; and when the cave was empty the Ass came out and said, “Well, I scared them pretty well, didn’t I?” “I should think you did,” said the Lion:  “why, if I hadn’t known you were an Ass, I should have turned and run myself.”

THE PROPHET

A Prophet sat in the market-place and told the fortunes of all who cared to engage his services.  Suddenly there came running up one who told him that his house had been broken into by thieves, and that they had made off with everything they could lay hands on.  He was up in a moment, and rushed off, tearing his hair and calling down curses on the miscreants.  The bystanders were much amused, and one of them said, “Our friend professes to know what is going to happen to others, but it seems he’s not clever enough to perceive what’s in store for himself.”

THE HOUND AND THE HARE

A young Hound started a Hare, and, when he caught her up, would at one moment snap at her with his teeth as though he were about to kill her, while at another he would let go his hold and frisk about her, as if he were playing with another dog.  At last the Hare said, “I wish you would show yourself in your true colours!  If you are my friend, why do you bite me?  If you are my enemy, why do you play with me?”

    He is no friend who plays double.

THE LION, THE MOUSE, AND THE FOX

A Lion was lying asleep at the mouth of his den when a Mouse ran over his back and tickled him so that he woke up with a start and began looking about everywhere to see what it was that had disturbed him.  A Fox, who was looking on, thought he would have a joke at the expense of the Lion; so he said, “Well, this is the first time I’ve seen a Lion afraid of a Mouse.”  “Afraid of a Mouse?” said the Lion testily:  “not I!  It’s his bad manners I can’t stand.”

THE TRUMPETER TAKEN PRISONER

A Trumpeter marched into battle in the van of the army and put courage into his comrades by his warlike tunes.  Being captured by the enemy, he begged for his life, and said, “Do not put me to death; I have killed no one:  indeed, I have no weapons, but carry with me only my trumpet here.”  But his captors replied, “That is only the more reason why we should take your life; for, though you do not fight yourself, you stir up others to do so.”

THE WOLF AND THE CRANE

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