Aesop's Fables; a new translation eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 119 pages of information about Aesop's Fables; a new translation.

THE DOG AND THE COOK

A rich man once invited a number of his friends and acquaintances to a banquet.  His dog thought it would be a good opportunity to invite another Dog, a friend of his; so he went to him and said, “My master is giving a feast:  there’ll be a fine spread, so come and dine with me to-night.”  The Dog thus invited came, and when he saw the preparations being made in the kitchen he said to himself, “My word, I’m in luck:  I’ll take care to eat enough to-night to last me two or three days.”  At the same time he wagged his tail briskly, by way of showing his friend how delighted he was to have been asked.  But just then the Cook caught sight of him, and, in his annoyance at seeing a strange Dog in the kitchen, caught him up by the hind legs and threw him out of the window.  He had a nasty fall, and limped away as quickly as he could, howling dismally.  Presently some other dogs met him, and said, “Well, what sort of a dinner did you get?” To which he replied, “I had a splendid time:  the wine was so good, and I drank so much of it, that I really don’t remember how I got out of the house!”

    Be shy of favours bestowed at the expense of others.

THE MONKEY AS KING

At a gathering of all the animals the Monkey danced and delighted them so much that they made him their King.  The Fox, however, was very much disgusted at the promotion of the Monkey:  so having one day found a trap with a piece of meat in it, he took the Monkey there and said to him, “Here is a dainty morsel I have found, sire; I did not take it myself, because I thought it ought to be reserved for you, our King.  Will you be pleased to accept it?” The Monkey made at once for the meat and got caught in the trap.  Then he bitterly reproached the Fox for leading him into danger; but the Fox only laughed and said, “O Monkey, you call yourself King of the Beasts and haven’t more sense than to be taken in like that!”

THE THIEVES AND THE COCK

Some Thieves broke into a house, and found nothing worth taking except a Cock, which they seized and carried off with them.  When they were preparing their supper, one of them caught up the Cock, and was about to wring his neck, when he cried out for mercy and said, “Pray do not kill me:  you will find me a most useful bird, for I rouse honest men to their work in the morning by my crowing.”  But the Thief replied with some heat, “Yes, I know you do, making it still harder for us to get a livelihood.  Into the pot you go!”

THE FARMER AND FORTUNE

A Farmer was ploughing one day on his farm when he turned up a pot of golden coins with his plough.  He was overjoyed at his discovery, and from that time forth made an offering daily at the shrine of the Goddess of the Earth.  Fortune was displeased at this, and came to him and said, “My man, why do you give Earth the credit for the gift which I bestowed upon you?  You never thought of thanking me for your good luck; but should you be unlucky enough to lose what you have gained I know very well that I, Fortune, should then come in for all the blame.”

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Aesop's Fables; a new translation from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook