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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 32 pages of information about The Pearl Story Book.

  Why dost thou clasp me as if I were going? 
  Why dost thou press thy cheek so unto mine? 
  Thy cheek is hot, and yet thy tears are flowing! 
  I will, dear mother, will be always thine!

  Do not sigh thus—­it marreth my reposing;
  But if thou weep, then I must weep with thee! 
  Ah, I am tired—­my weary eyes are closing—­
  Look, mother, look! the angel kisseth me!

[Illustration]

FRIGHTENED BY A COW.

  I.

  One morning Miss Lucy,
    As oft-times before,
  Went out in the fields
    With maid Ellenore: 

  II.

  The sun shone so bright,
    And the air was so still;
  Not a breath could be raised
    To turn the old mill.

  III.

  They walked through the fields
    All sprinkled with dew,
  Where the bright yellow flowers
    Gave a charm to the view;

  IV.

  The birds sang so gayly
    To bless the bright day,
  And sweetly the baby
    Talked and laughed by the way.

  V.

  Now Lucy knew well
    There was naught to alarm—­
  Old Brindle was gentle,
    And would do her no harm.

  VI.

  But the cow raised her head
    And looked round so bold,
  That she started and shrieked,
    And made Ellenore scold.

  VII.

  Then the man at the mill
    Rushed out in a fright,
  And seeing Miss Lucy
    All trembling and white,

[Illustration:  Frightened by A cow.]

  VIII.

  Said, “Have courage, young lady! 
    Pray cease your alarm;
  Cows never will hurt you,
    If you do them no harm.”

  IX.

  Now the baby he prattled,
    And begged for a ride;
  He clapped his hands loudly,
    And “Come, Mooly!” he cried;

  X.

  “Let me ride on your back
    O’er the green fields so bright,
  Where the busy bees hum—­
    Dear Mooly, you might.

  XI.

  “We’ll ride o’er the hills
    Where the lofty pines grow,
  And through the green lanes
    Of hawthorn we’ll go;

  XII.

  “We’ll ride through the groves
    Where the happy birds play,
  And sing a glad song
    Of praise by the way.”

THE RED SHOES.

BY HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN, TRANSLATED BY MARY HOWITT.

* * * * *

CHAPTER FIRST.

HOW LITTLE KAREN WAS ADOPTED BY A LADY, AND HOW SHE CAME BY HER RED SHOES.

There was once a little girl who was very pretty and delicate, but in the summer she was obliged to run about with bare feet, she was so poor, and in the winter to wear large wooden shoes, which made her little instep quite red, and that looked so dangerous!

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