A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 322 pages of information about A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents.

Now, therefore, to the end that the same may be observed and performed with good faith on the part of the United States, I have ordered the said treaty to be herewith published; and I do hereby enjoin and require all officers of the United States, civil and military, and all other citizens and inhabitants thereof, faithfully to observe and fulfill the same.

Given under my hand and the seal of the United States, in the city of New York, the 14th day of August, A.D. 1790, and in the fifteenth year of the Sovereignty and Independence of the United States.

[SEAL.]

GEORGE WASHINGTON.

By the President: 
  THOMAS JEFFERSON.

[From Miscellaneous letters, Department of State, vol. 3.]

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas it hath at this time become peculiarly necessary to warn the citizens of the United States against a violation of the treaties made at Hopewell, on the Keowee, on the 28th day of November, 1785, and on the 3d and 10th days of January, 1786, between the United States and the Cherokee, Choctaw, and Chickasaw nations of Indians, and to enforce an act entitled “An act to regulate trade and intercourse with the Indian tribes,” copies of which treaties and act are hereunto annexed, I have therefore thought fit to require, and I do by these presents require, all officers of the United States, as well civil as military, and all other citizens and inhabitants thereof, to govern themselves according to the treaties and act aforesaid, as they will answer the contrary at their peril.

Given under my hand and the seal of the United States, in the city of New York, the 26th day of August, A.D. 1790, and in the fifteenth year of the Sovereignty and Independence of the United States.

[SEAL.]

GEORGE WASHINGTON.

By the President: 
  THOMAS JEFFERSON.

SECOND ANNUAL ADDRESS.

UNITED STATES, December 8, 1790.

Fellow-Citizens of the Senate and House of Representatives

In meeting you again I feel much satisfaction in being able to repeat my congratulations on the favorable prospects which continue to distinguish our public affairs.  The abundant fruits of another year have blessed our country with plenty and with the means of a flourishing commerce.  The progress of public credit is witnessed by a considerable rise of American stock abroad as well as at home, and the revenues allotted for this and other national purposes have been productive beyond the calculations by which they were regulated.  This latter circumstance is the more pleasing, as it is not only a proof of the fertility of our resources, but as it assures us of a further increase of the national respectability and credit, and, let me add, as it bears an honorable testimony to the patriotism and integrity of the mercantile and marine part of our citizens.  The punctuality of the former in discharging their engagements has been exemplary.

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