A School History of the United States eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 417 pages of information about A School History of the United States.
Assumption of / Yes ---------------------------------------+-+ |[1]
state debts. \ No ----------------------------------+ | | |
| | | /
Establishment / Yes -----------------------------------------+
of a national | | |
bank. \ No ------------------------------------+ |
| | |
Internal revenue / Too heavy ----------------------- \ | | | taxes. \ | | | |
| | | |
/ / President too | | | |
| | exclusive. | | | | \
| Aristocratic | Secret sessions | | | | |
Administration | customs. | of the Senate. |—­+-+-+ |[2] not democratic. | | Gowns of the | |
| \ justices. | /
| Monarchial / Great debt. |
| institutions. | National bank. |
\ \ Heavy taxes. /

\ / Leaders.
[1]—–­| Federalists | Washington.
/ | Adams.
\ Hamilton.

\             /   Leaders.
|             | Jefferson.
[2]—–­| Republicans | Madison.
|             | Monroe.
|             | Randolph.
/             \ Gallatin.

CHAPTER XVI

THE STRUGGLE FOR NEUTRALITY

%227.  Trouble with Great Britain and France.%—­From the congressional election in 1792 we may date the beginning of organized political parties in the United States.  They sprang from differences of opinion as to domestic matters.  But on a sudden in 1793 Federalists and Republicans became divided on questions of foreign affairs.

Ever since 1789 France had been in a state of revolution, and at last (in 1792) the people established the French Republic, cut off the heads of the King and Queen (in 1793), and declared war on England and sent a minister, Genet, to the United States.  At that time we had no treaty with Great Britain except the treaty of peace.  With France, however, we had two treaties,—­one of alliance, and one of amity and commerce.  The treaty of alliance bound us to guarantee to France “the possessions of the crown of France in America,” by which were meant the French West Indian Islands.  When Washington heard that war had been declared by France, and that a French minister was on his way to America, he became alarmed lest this minister should call on him to make good the guarantee by sending a fleet to the Indies.  On consulting his secretaries, they advised him that the guarantee applied only when France was attacked, and not when she was the attacking party.  The President thereupon issued a proclamation of neutrality; that is, declared that the United States would not side with either party in the war, but would treat both alike.

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A School History of the United States from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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