The Discovery of Yellowstone Park eBook

Nathaniel P. Langford
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 166 pages of information about The Discovery of Yellowstone Park.

N.P.  LANGFORD.]

[Footnote AB:  This lake is now called “Hell’s Half-acre;” and from the lower lake the “Excelsior” geyser has burst forth.]

[Footnote AC:  The fountain and jets here referred to are those of the Lower Geyser Basin, and the larger column of water which we saw is undoubtedly the “Fountain” geyser, named by Dr. Hayden in 1871.]

[Footnote AD:  In the course of a recent correspondence with Mr. Stickney, I asked him if he recalled this incident.  Under date of May 20, 1905, he wrote me from Sarasota, Florida:  “The maple sugar incident had almost faded from my memory, but like a spark of fire smouldering under rubbish it needed but a breath to make it live, and I recall my reflections, after my astonishment, that you did so many quaint things, that it was quite in accordance with them that you should produce maple sugar in a sulphurous region.”

N.P.  LANGFORD.]

[Footnote AE:  This stream was afterwards named “Gibbon river.”]

APPENDIX.

It is much to be regretted that our expedition was not accompanied by an expert photographer; but at the time of our departure from Helena, no one skilled in the art could be found with whom the hazards of the journey did not outweigh any seeming advantage or compensation which the undertaking promised.

The accompanying sketches of the two falls of the Yellowstone, and of the cones of the Grand and Castle geysers, were made by Walter Trumbull and Private Moore.  They are the very first ever made of these objects.  Through an inadvertence in the preparation of the electroyped plates for the printer, they did not appear in their proper places in this diary.  Major Hiram M. Chittenden, in his volume “The Yellowstone Park,” says of the two sketches made by Private Moore:  “His quaint sketches of the falls forcibly remind one of the original picture of Niagara, made by Father Hennepin, in 1697.”

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The Discovery of Yellowstone Park from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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