Rollo at Play eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 96 pages of information about Rollo at Play.

“I cannot get it so,” said he.

“What shall we do?” said James.  “How foolish I was to put it so near the water!”

“I think we shall contrive some way to get it,” said Jonas.

He then sat down on the rock and looked into the water.  “We can go home and get a long pair of tongs, and get it with them at any rate,” said he.

“O, yes,” said Rollo, “I will go and get them;” and he ran off towards the bridge.

“No,” said Jonas, “stop; I will try one plan more.”

So he went and cut a long straight stem of a bush, and trimmed it up smooth, and cut the largest end off exactly square.  Then he went to a hemlock tree near, and took off some of the gum, which was very “sticky.”  He pressed some of this with his knife on the end of the stick.  Then he reached it very carefully down, and pressed it hard against the half dollar; it crowded the half dollar down into the sand, out of sight.

“There, you have lost it,” said James.

“I don’t know,” said Jonas; and he began slowly and carefully to draw it up.

When the end of the stick came up out of the sand, the boys saw, to their great delight, that the half dollar was sticking fast on.  They clapped their hands, and capered about on the stone, while Jonas gently drew up the half dollar, and put it, all wet and dripping, into James’s hand.

The boys thanked Jonas for getting up the money, and then they asked him to keep both pieces for them until they went home.  Then they began to think of the wigwam again.

“We will make the window as you want it, James,” said Rollo; “I am willing.”

“No,” said James, “I was just going to say we would make it your way.  I rather think it would be better to make it towards the land.”

“Why can you not have two windows?” said Jonas.

“So we can,” said both of the boys; and they immediately went to work collecting branches and weaving them in, leaving a space for a window both sides.  Their quarrelsome feelings were all gone, and they talked very pleasantly at their work until it was time for them to go home to dinner.

THE STEEPLE TRAP

[Illustration:  “An escape.”]

THE STEEPLE TRAP

* * * * *

THE WAY TO CATCH A SQUIRREL

The afternoon of the day when Rollo and his cousin James made their wigwam in the woods by the brook, they were at work there again, employed very harmoniously together, in finishing their edifice, when suddenly Jonas, who was at work in the woods at a little distance, heard them both calling to him, in tones of surprise and pleasure—­

“O, Jonas, Jonas, come here quick—­quick.”

Jonas dropped his axe and ran.

When he got near them, they pointed to a log.

“See there;—­see;—­see there.”

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Rollo at Play from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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