The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 01 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 363 pages of information about The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 01.

THE FIRST

Not I! restraints of all kinds I detest. 
Quick! let us catch the wild-game ere it flies;
The hand on Saturday the mop that plies
Will on the Sunday fondle you the best.

BURGHER

No, this new Burgomaster; I like him not, God knows;
No, he’s in office; daily more arrogant he grows;
And for the town, what doth he do for it? 
Are not things worse from day to day? 
To more restraints we must submit;
And taxes more than ever pay.

BEGGAR (sings)

Kind gentlemen and ladies fair,
So rosy-cheek’d and trimly dress’d,
Be pleas’d to listen to my prayer;
Relieve and pity the distress’d. 
Let me not vainly sing my lay! 
His heart’s most glad whose hand is free. 
Now when all men keep holiday,
Should be a harvest-day to me.

OTHER BURGHER

On holidays and Sundays naught know I more inviting
Than chatting about war and war’s alarms,
When folk in Turkey, up in arms,
Far off, are ’gainst each other fighting. 
We at the window stand, our glasses drain
And watch adown the stream the painted vessels gliding;
Then joyful we at eve come home again,
And peaceful times we bless, peace long-abiding.

THIRD BURGHER

Ay, neighbor!  So let matters stand for me! 
There they may scatter one another’s brains,
And wild confusion round them see—­
So here at home in quiet all remains!

OLD WOMAN (to the BURGHERS’ DAUGHTERS)

Heyday!  How smart!  The fresh young blood! 
Who would not fall in love with you? 
Not quite so proud!  ’Tis well and good! 
And what you wish, that I could help you to.

BURGHER’S DAUGHTER

Come, Agatha!  I care not to be seen
Walking in public with these witches.  True,
My future lover, last St. Andrew’s E’en,
In flesh and blood she brought before my view.

ANOTHER

And mine she show’d me also in the glass. 
A soldier’s figure, with companions bold;
I look around, I seek him as I pass—­
In vain, his form I nowhere can behold.

SOLDIERS

Fortress with turrets
And walls high in air,
Damsel disdainful,
Haughty and fair—­
These be my prey! 
Bold is the venture,
Costly the pay!

Hark, how the trumpet
Thither doth call us
Where either pleasure
Or death may befall us! 
Hail to the tumult! 
Life’s in the field! 
Damsel and fortress
To us must yield. 
Bold is the venture,
Costly the pay! 
Gaily the soldier
Marches away.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 01 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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