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Personal Memoirs of a Residence of Thirty Years with the Indian Tribes on the American Frontiers eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 811 pages of information about Personal Memoirs of a Residence of Thirty Years with the Indian Tribes on the American Frontiers.

Dr. Houghton writes from Fredonia (May 12th):  “I shall leave here immediately after the twenty-fourth, and hope to see you as early as the second or third of June.  I have heard from Torrey, and have sent him a suit of plants.”

The Secretary of War again writes (May 22d):  “It has been impossible before now, to make you a remittance of funds, and they cannot yet all be sent for your expedition.  Our annual appropriation has not yet passed, and when it will I am sure I cannot tell.  So you must get along as well as you can.  I trust, however, the amount now sent will be sufficient to enable you to start upon your expedition.  The residue promised to you, as well as the funds for your ordinary expenditures, shall be sent as soon as the appropriation is made.”

The sub-agent, in charge of the agency at Mackinack, writes (May 22d):  “Gen. Brook arrived yesterday from Green Bay, and has concluded to make this post his head-quarters.  I was up, yesterday, in the garrison, and Capt.  McCabe introduced me to him.  I found him a very pleasant, plain, unassuming man.  Col.  Boyd has handed me a list of articles which you will find inclosed, &c.”

“The committee,” says the Rev. David Green, Boston, “wish me to express to you the satisfaction they have in learning that your views respecting the importance of making known the great truths of the Gospel to the Indians, as the basis on which to build their improvement, in all respects accords so perfectly with their own.  It is our earnest desire that our missionaries should act wisely in all their labors for the benefit of the Indians, and that all the measures which may be adopted by them, or by others who seek to promote the present or future welfare of this unhappy and long-abused people, may be under the Divine guidance, and crowned with great success.”

These triple claims, which have now been mentioned, of business, of science, and of religion, on my attention created not the least distraction on my mind, but, on the contrary, appeared to have propitious and harmonizing influences.

CHAPTER XLIII.

Expedition to, and discovery of, Itasca Lake, the source of the Mississippi River—­Brief notice of the journey to the point of former geographical discovery in the basin of Upper Red Cedar, or Cass Lake—­Ascent and portage to Queen Anne’s Lake—­Lake Pemetascodiac—­The Ten, or Metoswa Rapids—­Pemidgegomag, or Cross-water Lake—­Lake Irving—­Lake Marquette—­Lake La Salle—­Lake Plantagenet—­Ascent of the Plantagenian Fork—­Naiwa, or Copper-snake River—­Agate Rapids and portage—­Assawa Lake—­Portage over the Hauteur des Terres—­Itasca Lake—­Its picturesque character—­Geographical and astronomical position—­Historical data.

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