Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 141 pages of information about Reform Cookery Book (4th edition).

Cobden Pudding.

Four ozs. grain granules, 2 ozs. sugar, 1 oz. cocoanut cream, 3 ozs. stoned raisins, 2 eggs, 3 gills milk.

Put grain granules, sugar, raisins, and cocoanut cream in large basin.  Bring milk to boil and pour over.  Cover and let stand till cool.  Beat up yolks and add, and lastly the whites beaten stiff.  Pour into buttered pudding-dish and bake in moderate oven for an hour.

JAMS AND JELLIES.

We have not space to go into these at any length.  The following are one or two of my “very own,” as the children say, which are voted a great success.

Apple Jam.

Take quantity required—­say 7 lbs.—­tart crisp apples.  Wash well and dry.  Pare and core, putting the trimmings in water to cover.  Cut up the best of the apples into small pieces—­not too thin—­and set aside, also covered with cold water.  Put on the trimmings to boil with some lemon rind and either a few sticks of cinnamon or some cloves.  Simmer for an hour or longer, till all the goodness is drawn out, mashing freely with a wooden spoon.  Turn into jelly-bag and allow to drain without pressure.  Pour the water off the apples, measure that and the drained juice, and put into preserving pan.  Measure the apple chips also, and add when the liquid boils.  Allow 14 ozs. loaf sugar to each breakfast cupful, and boil till the apples are clear, but not broken down—­about 20 minutes.  Skim and pot as usual.  If ginger flavouring is preferred, shave down about 6 ozs. preserved ginger, and add when the juice is put on to boil.

Marmalade Jelly.

Take 3 lbs. fruit—­6 bitter oranges, 3 sweet ones and 3 lemons.  Remove the rinds and grate them small, or put through a mincer.  Cut up the oranges, removing the seeds, which put in a tumbler of water.  Cover the oranges, &c., with 17 tumblers cold water, and let stand for at least 24 hours.  Put all in jelly-pan, including the water drained from the seeds, and let boil gently, for about 2 hours, mashing frequently with a wooden spoon.  Let drain without pressure.  Measure the juice, and to each pint allow 14 ozs. sugar, which add after the liquid boils.  Boil fast for a few minutes, try if it will set.  Skim and pot.  But the pulp must not be thrown out, for it makes an excellent, if rather homely,

Marmalade,

which comes in specially useful for steamed puddings, &c.  Weigh the pulp, and allow equal weight of sugar.  Boil gently, taking great care not to burn, till clear—­20 to 30 minutes.

Green Gooseberry and Strawberry Jam.

This will be appreciated by those who find the ordinary strawberry jam rather sweet and heavy.  Take equal quantities of gooseberries and strawberries—­say 3 lbs. of each.  Trim the gooseberries, which must be firm and freshly pulled, and wash well.  Put on to boil with a teacupful water to each lb. of gooseberries, and boil for 10 minutes.  Add the strawberries and the sugar lb. for lb., and boil for 20 minutes longer, or till it will “jell,” as Meg would say.

Follow Us on Facebook