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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 249 pages of information about Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl.

My heart was exceedingly full.  I remembered how my poor father had tried to buy me, when I was a small child, and how he had been disappointed.  I hoped his spirit was rejoicing over me now.  I remembered how my good old grandmother had laid up her earnings to purchase me in later years, and how often her plans had been frustrated.  How that faithful, loving old heart would leap for joy, if she could look on me and my children now that we were free!  My relatives had been foiled in all their efforts, but God had raised me up a friend among strangers, who had bestowed on me the precious, long-desired boon.  Friend!  It is a common word, often lightly used.  Like other good and beautiful things, it may be tarnished by careless handling; but when I speak of Mrs. Bruce as my friend, the word is sacred.

My grandmother lived to rejoice in my freedom; but not long after, a letter came with a black seal.  She had gone “where the wicked cease from troubling, and the weary are at rest.”

Time passed on, and a paper came to me from the south, containing an obituary notice of my uncle Phillip.  It was the only case I ever knew of such an honor conferred upon a colored person.  It was written by one of his friends, and contained these words:  “Now that death has laid him low, they call him a good man and a useful citizen; but what are eulogies to the black man, when the world has faded from his vision?  It does not require man’s praise to obtain rest in God’s kingdom.”  So they called a colored man a citizen!  Strange words to be uttered in that region!

Reader, my story ends with freedom; not in the usual way, with marriage.  I and my children are now free!  We are as free from the power of slaveholders as are the white people of the north; and though that, according to my ideas, is not saying a great deal, it is a vast improvement in my condition.  The dream of my life is not yet realized.  I do not sit with my children in a home of my own, I still long for a hearthstone of my own, however humble.  I wish it for my children’s sake far more than for my own.  But God so orders circumstances as to keep me with my friend Mrs. Bruce.  Love, duty, gratitude, also bind me to her side.  It is a privilege to serve her who pities my oppressed people, and who has bestowed the inestimable boon of freedom on me and my children.

It has been painful to me, in many ways, to recall the dreary years I passed in bondage.  I would gladly forget them if I could.  Yet the retrospection is not altogether without solace; for with those gloomy recollections come tender memories of my good old grandmother, like light, fleecy clouds floating over a dark and troubled sea.

APPENDIX.

The following statement is from Amy Post, a member of the Society of Friends in the State of New York, well known and highly respected by friends of the poor and the oppressed.  As has been already stated, in the preceding pages, the author of this volume spent some time under her hospitable roof.

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