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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 249 pages of information about Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl.

The captain soon came to advise us to go on deck for fresh air.  His friendly and respectful manner, combined with Fanny’s testimony, reassured me, and we went with him.  He placed us in a comfortable seat, and occasionally entered into conversation.  He told us he was a Southerner by birth, and had spent the greater part of his life in the Slave States, and that he had recently lost a brother who traded in slaves.  “But,” said he, “it is a pitiable and degrading business, and I always felt ashamed to acknowledge my brother in connection with it.”  As we passed Snaky Swamp, he pointed to it, and said, “There is a slave territory that defies all the laws.”  I thought of the terrible days I had spent there, and though it was not called Dismal Swamp, it made me feel very dismal as I looked at it.

I shall never forget that night.  The balmy air of spring was so refreshing!  And how shall I describe my sensations when we were fairly sailing on Chesapeake Bay?  O, the beautiful sunshine! the exhilarating breeze!  And I could enjoy them without fear or restraint.  I had never realized what grand things air and sunlight are till I had been deprived of them.

Ten days after we left land we were approaching Philadelphia.  The captain said we should arrive there in the night, but he thought we had better wait till morning, and go on shore in broad daylight, as the best way to avoid suspicion.

I replied, “You know best.  But will you stay on board and protect us?”

He saw that I was suspicious, and he said he was sorry, now that he had brought us to the end of our voyage, to find I had so little confidence in him.  Ah, if he had ever been a slave he would have known how difficult it was to trust a white man.  He assured us that we might sleep through the night without fear; that he would take care we were not left unprotected.  Be it said to the honor of this captain, Southerner as he was, that if Fanny and I had been white ladies, and our passage lawfully engaged, he could not have treated us more respectfully.  My intelligent friend, Peter, had rightly estimated the character of the man to whose honor he had intrusted us.  The next morning I was on deck as soon as the day dawned.  I called Fanny to see the sun rise, for the first time in our lives, on free soil; for such I then believed it to be.  We watched the reddening sky, and saw the great orb come up slowly out of the water, as it seemed.  Soon the waves began to sparkle, and every thing caught the beautiful glow.  Before us lay the city of strangers.  We looked at each other, and the eyes of both were moistened with tears.  We had escaped from slavery, and we supposed ourselves to be safe from the hunters.  But we were alone in the world, and we had left dear ties behind us; ties cruelly sundered by the demon Slavery.

XXXI.  Incidents In Philadelphia.

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