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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 491 pages of information about Samuel F. B. Morse, His Letters and Journals.

DRAWINGS FROM 1832 SKETCH-BOOK, SHOWING FIRST CONCEPTION OF TELEGRAPH

Morse’s first telegraph instrument
    Now in the National Museum, Washington.

Rough drawing by Morse showing the first form of the alphabet and the changes to the present form

Quantities of the type found in the type-cases of A printing-officeCalculation made by Morse to aid him in simplifying alphabet

Attention universe, by kingdoms right wheel.”  Facsimile of first
Morse alphabet message
    Given to General Thomas S. Cummings at time of transmission by
    Professor S.F.B.  Morse, New York University, Wednesday, January 24,
    1838.  Presented to the National Museum at Washington by the family
    of General Thomas S. Cummings of New York, February 13, 1906.

Drawing by Morse of railway telegraph, patented by him in France in 1838, and embodying principle of police and fire alarm telegraph

First form of key.—­Improved form of key.—­Early relay.—­First
Washington-Baltimore instrument
    The two keys and the relay are in the National Museum, Washington. 
    The Washington-Baltimore instrument is owned by Cornell University.

S. F. B. Morse
    From a portrait by Daniel Huntington.

HOUSE AT LOCUST GROVE, POUGHKEEPSIE, NEW YORK

Sarah Elizabeth Griswold, second wife of S. F. B. Morse
    From a daguerreotype.

Morse and his youngest son
    From an ambrotype.

HOUSE AND LIBRARY AT 5 WEST 22D STREET, NEW YORK

Telegram showing Morse’s characteristic deadhead, which he always used
to frank his messages

Morse in old age
    From a photograph by Sarony.

SAMUEL F. B. MORSE

HIS LETTERS AND JOURNALS

CHAPTER XXI

OCTOBER 1, 1832—­FEBRUARY 28, 1833

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