Alice's Adventures in Wonderland eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 72 pages of information about Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

  `Ugh!’ said the Lory, with a shiver.

`I beg your pardon!’ said the Mouse, frowning, but very politely:  `Did you speak?’

  `Not I!’ said the Lory hastily.

`I thought you did,’ said the Mouse. `—­I proceed.  “Edwin and Morcar, the earls of Mercia and Northumbria, declared for him:  and even Stigand, the patriotic archbishop of Canterbury, found it advisable—­“’

  `Found what?’ said the Duck.

`Found it,’ the Mouse replied rather crossly:  `of course you know what “it” means.’

`I know what “it” means well enough, when I find a thing,’ said the Duck:  `it’s generally a frog or a worm.  The question is, what did the archbishop find?’

The Mouse did not notice this question, but hurriedly went on, `”—­found it advisable to go with Edgar Atheling to meet William and offer him the crown.  William’s conduct at first was moderate.  But the insolence of his Normans—­” How are you getting on now, my dear?’ it continued, turning to Alice as it spoke.

`As wet as ever,’ said Alice in a melancholy tone:  `it doesn’t seem to dry me at all.’

`In that case,’ said the Dodo solemnly, rising to its feet, `I move that the meeting adjourn, for the immediate adoption of more energetic remedies—­’

`Speak English!’ said the Eaglet. `I don’t know the meaning of half those long words, and, what’s more, I don’t believe you do either!’ And the Eaglet bent down its head to hide a smile:  some of the other birds tittered audibly.

`What I was going to say,’ said the Dodo in an offended tone, `was, that the best thing to get us dry would be a Caucus-race.’

`What is a Caucus-race?’ said Alice; not that she wanted much to know, but the Dodo had paused as if it thought that somebody ought to speak, and no one else seemed inclined to say anything.

`Why,’ said the Dodo, `the best way to explain it is to do it.’  (And, as you might like to try the thing yourself, some winter day, I will tell you how the Dodo managed it.)

First it marked out a race-course, in a sort of circle, (`the exact shape doesn’t matter,’ it said,) and then all the party were placed along the course, here and there.  There was no `One, two, three, and away,’ but they began running when they liked, and left off when they liked, so that it was not easy to know when the race was over.  However, when they had been running half an hour or so, and were quite dry again, the Dodo suddenly called out `The race is over!’ and they all crowded round it, panting, and asking, `But who has won?’

This question the Dodo could not answer without a great deal of thought, and it sat for a long time with one finger pressed upon its forehead (the position in which you usually see Shakespeare, in the pictures of him), while the rest waited in silence.  At last the Dodo said, `everybody has won, and all must have prizes.’

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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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