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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 55 pages of information about The Wendigo.

It was really admirable how he emerged victor in the end; men of riper powers and experience might have come through the ordeal with less success.  He had himself tolerably well in hand, all things considered, and his plan of action proves it.  Sleep being absolutely out of the question and traveling an unknown trail in the darkness equally impracticable, he sat up the whole of that night, rifle in hand, before a fire he never for a single moment allowed to die down.  The severity of the haunted vigil marked his soul for life; but it was successfully accomplished; and with the very first signs of dawn he set forth upon the long return journey to the home camp to get help.  As before, he left a written note to explain his absence, and to indicate where he had left a plentiful cache of food and matches—­though he had no expectation that any human hands would find them!

How Simpson found his way alone by the lake and forest might well make a story in itself, for to hear him tell it is to know the passionate loneliness of soul that a man can feel when the Wilderness holds him in the hollow of its illimitable hand—­and laughs.  It is also to admire his indomitable pluck.

He claims no skill, declaring that he followed the almost invisible trail mechanically, and without thinking.  And this, doubtless, is the truth.  He relied upon the guiding of the unconscious mind, which is instinct.  Perhaps, too, some sense of orientation, known to animals and primitive men, may have helped as well, for through all that tangled region he succeeded in reaching the exact spot where Defago had hidden the canoe nearly three days before with the remark, “Strike doo west across the lake into the sun to find the camp.”

There was not much sun left to guide him, but he used his compass to the best of his ability, embarking in the frail craft for the last twelve miles of his journey with a sensation of immense relief that the forest was at last behind him.  And, fortunately, the water was calm; he took his line across the center of the lake instead of coasting round the shores for another twenty miles.  Fortunately, too, the other hunters were back.  The light of their fires furnished a steering point without which he might have searched all night long for the actual position of the camp.

It was close upon midnight all the same when his canoe grated on the sandy cove, and Hank, Punk and his uncle, disturbed in their sleep by his cries, ran quickly down and helped a very exhausted and broken specimen of Scotch humanity over the rocks toward a dying fire.

VI

The sudden entrance of his prosaic uncle into this world of wizardry and horror that had haunted him without interruption now for two days and two nights, had the immediate effect of giving to the affair an entirely new aspect.  The sound of that crisp “Hulloa, my boy!  And what’s up now?” and the grasp of that dry and vigorous hand introduced another standard of judgment.  A revulsion of feeling washed through him.  He realized that he had let himself “go” rather badly.  He even felt vaguely ashamed of himself.  The native hard-headedness of his race reclaimed him.

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