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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 180 pages of information about At Sunwich Port, Complete.

CHAPTER XIV

Captain Nugent awoke the morning after his attempt to crimp his son with a bad headache.  Not an ordinary headache, to disappear with a little cold water and fresh air; but a splitting, racking affair, which made him feel all head and dulness.  Weights pressed upon his eye-lids and the back of his head seemed glued to his pillow.

He groaned faintly and, raising himself upon his elbow, opened his eyes and sat up with a sharp exclamation.  His bed was higher from the floor than usual and, moreover, the floor was different.  In the dim light he distinctly saw a ship’s forecastle, untidy bunks with frouzy bedclothes, and shiny oil-skins hanging from the bulkhead.

For a few moments he stared about in mystification; he was certainly ill, and no doubt the forecastle was an hallucination.  It was a strange symptom, and the odd part of it was that everything was so distinct.  Even the smell.  He stared harder, in the hope that his surroundings would give place to the usual ones, and, leaning a little bit more on his elbow, nearly rolled out of the bunk.  Resolved to probe this mystery to the bottom he lowered himself to the floor and felt distinctly the motion of a ship at sea.

There was no doubt about it.  He staggered to the door and, holding by the side, looked on to the deck.  The steamer was rolling in a fresh sea and a sweet strong wind blew refreshingly into his face.  Funnels, bridge, and masts swung with a rhythmical motion; loose gear rattled, and every now and then a distant tinkle sounded faintly from the steward’s pantry.

He stood bewildered, trying to piece together the events of the preceding night, and to try and understand by what miracle he was back on board his old ship the Conqueror.  There was no doubt as to her identity.  He knew every inch of her, and any further confirmation that might be required was fully supplied by the appearance of the long, lean figure of Captain Hardy on the bridge.

Captain Nugent took his breath sharply and began to realize the situation.  He stepped to the side and looked over; the harbour was only a little way astern, and Sunwich itself, looking cold and cheerless beyond the dirty, tumbling seas, little more than a mile distant.

At the sight his spirits revived, and with a hoarse cry he ran shouting towards the bridge.  Captain Hardy turned sharply at the noise, and recognizing the intruder stood peering down at him in undisguised amazement.

[Illustration:  “He stepped to the side and looked over.”]

“Put back,” cried Nugent, waving up at him.  “Put back.”

“What on earth are you doing on my ship?” inquired the astonished Hardy.

“Put me ashore,” cried Nugent, imperiously; “don’t waste time talking.  D’ye hear?  Put me ashore.”

The amazement died out of Hardy’s face and gave way to an expression of anger.  For a time he regarded the red and threatening visage of Captain Nugent in silence, then he turned to the second officer.

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