Paris under the Commune eBook

John Leighton Stuart
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 389 pages of information about Paris under the Commune.

BARRICADE CLOSING THE RUE DE RIVOLI FROM THE PLACE DE LA CONCORDE

BULLET MARKS “EN FACE” AND “EN PROFIL”—­THE TREES AND LAMPS

RUE ROYALE, LOOKING FROM THE MADELEINE TO THE PLACE DE LA CONCORDE

A WARM CORNER OF THE TUILERIES

PORTRAIT OF MILLIERE, EX-DEPUTY, MEMBER OF THE COMMUNE

PALAIS DE JUSTICE

POLICE OF PARIS—­MINISTRY OF FINANCE, RUE DE RIVOLI

PORTRAIT OF FERRE, PREFECT OF POLICE

PALACE OF THE LUXEMBOURG (AMBULANCE HOSPITAL OF THE COMMUNE)

PETROLEURS AND PETROLEUSES

THE THEATRE OF THE PORTE ST-MARTIN—­ALL THAT REMAINS OF THE HOME OF SENSATION DRAMA

CELL OF THE ARCHBISHOP OF PARIS IN THE PRISON OF LA ROQUETTE

YARD OF LA ROQUETTE WHERE THE ARCHBISHOP AND HOSTAGES WERE SHOT

MY NEIGHBOUR OPPOSITE, BUSINESS CARRIED ON AS USUAL—­MY NEIGHBOUR NEXT DOOR, HE THINKS HIMSELF FORTUNATE

PARIS UNDERGROUND (SEWERS AND CATACOMBS)

THE ENEMIES OF PROGRESS (LES ARISTOCRATES ENCORE)—­CORPS DE GARDE DE L’ARMEE DE VERSAILLES

THE PUBLIC PROMENADES—­A CAMP IN THE LUXEMBOURG—­THE NEW MASTERS—­PROCLAMATION OVER PROCLAMATION

THE LUXEMBOURG (PRESENT TOWN HALL OF PARIS, 1871)

PORTRAIT OF MARSHAL MACMAHON, DUKE OF MAGENTA

LIGHT AND AIR ONCE MORE—­THE FOSSE COMMUNE (THE END)

APPENDIX.

MUSEE OF THE LOUVRE, FROM THE PLACE DU CARROUSEL

PALAIS ROYAL

HOTEL DE VILLE

FOREIGN OFFICE

PALACE OF THE LEGION OF HONOUR

MAP OF PARIS, WITH INDICATIONS OF ALL THE PARTS DAMAGED OR DESTROYED.

[Illustration:  M. THIERS, Voted Chief of the Executive Power Feb. 18,1871, and President of the Republic, Sept. 1871.]

PARIS

UNDER THE COMMUNE.

INTRODUCTORY.

Late in the day of the 30th October, 1870, the agitation was great in Paris; the news had spread that the village of Le Bourget had been retaken by the Prussians.  The military report had done what it could to render the pill less bitter by saying that “this village did not form a part of the system of defence,” but the people though kept in ignorance perceived instinctively that there must be weakness on the part of the chiefs.  After so much French blood had been shed in taking the place, men of brave will would not have been wanting to occupy it.  We admit that Le Bourget may not have been important from a military point of view, but as regarding its moral effect its loss was much to be regretted.

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Paris under the Commune from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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