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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 154 pages of information about Hardy Ornamental Flowering Trees and Shrubs.

P. ARBUTIFOLIA (syns Crataegus arbutifolia and Mespilus arbutifolia).—­Arbutus-leaved Photinia, or Californian May-bush.  California, 1796.  This is a very distinct shrub, with leaves resembling those of the Strawberry Tree (Arbutus), the flowers in an elongated panicle, and bright red bark on the young wood.

P. BENTHAMIANA is only worthy of culture for its neat habit and freedom of growth when suitably placed.

P. SERRULATA (syn Crataegus glabra).—­Chinese Hawthorn.  Japan and China, 1804.  This has Laurel-like leaves, 4 inches or 5 inches long, and, especially when young, of a beautiful rosy-chocolate colour, and clustered at the branch-tips.  Flowers small, white, and produced in flat corymbs.  An invaluable seaside shrub.

They all grow well either in light, rich loam, or in sandy, peaty earth, and are usually propagated by grafting.

PHYLODOCE.

PHYLODOCE TAXIFOLIA (syns P. caerulea and Menziesia caerulea).—­An almost extinct native species, having crowded linear leaves, and lilac-blue flowers.  It is only of value for rock gardening.

PIERIS.

PIERIS FLORIBUNDA (syns Andromeda floribunda and Leucothoe floribunda).—­United States, 1812.  Few perfectly hardy shrubs are more beautiful than this, with its pure white Lily-of-the-Valley like flowers, borne in dense racemes and small, neat, dark green leaves.  To cultivate this handsome shrub in a satisfactory way, fairly rich loam or peat, and a situation sheltered from cold and cutting winds, are necessities.

P. JAPONICA (syn Andromeda japonica).—­Japan, 1882.  A hardy, well-known shrub, that was first brought specially under notice in “The Garden,” and of which a coloured plate and description were given.  It is thickly furnished with neat and small deep-green, leathery leaves, and pretty, waxy white flowers, pendulous at the branch tips.  Planted in free, sandy peat, it thrives vigorously, and soon forms a neat specimen of nearly a yard in height.  It is a very desirable hardy species, and one that can be confidently recommended for ornamental planting.  There is a variegated variety, P. japonica elegantissima, with leaves clearly edged with creamy-white, and flushed with pink.  Amongst variegated, small-growing shrubs it is a gem.

P. MARIANA (syn Andromeda Mariana ovalis).—­North America, 1736.  A neat shrub of about 3 feet in height, with oval leaves, and pretty white flowers in pendent clusters.

P. OVALIFOLIA (syn Andromeda ovalifolia).—­Nepaul, 1825.  A fine, tall-growing species, with oval-pointed, leathery leaves placed on long footstalks.  Flowers in lengthened, drooping, one-sided racemes, and white or pale flesh-coloured.  Being perfectly hardy, and attaining to as much as 20 feet in height, it is a desirable species for the lawn or shrubbery.

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