The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb — Volume 6 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 491 pages of information about The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb Volume 6.

This letter, up to a certain point, was repeated as follows.  It also is at South Kensington:—­]

LETTER 557

CHARLES LAMB TO JOHN FORSTER

[No date.]

I wish youd go to Dilke’s, or let Mockson, and ax him to add this to what I sent him a few days since, or to continue it the week after.  The Plantas &c. are capital.  Come down with Procter and Dante on Sunday.  I send you the last proof—­not of my friendship.  I knew you would like the title.  I do thoroughly.  The Last Essays of Elia keeps out any notion of its being a second volume.

LETTER 558

CHARLES LAMB TO JOHN FORSTER

[No date.]

There was a talk of Richmond on Sunday but we were hampered with an unavoidable engagement that day, besides that I wish to show it you when the woods are in full leaf.  Can you have a quiet evening here to night or tomorrow night?  We are certainly at home.

Yours C. LAMB.

Friday.

LETTER 559

CHARLES LAMB TO EDWARD MOXON

[P.M.  Jan. 24, 1833.]

Dear Murray! Moxon I mean.—­I am not to be making you pay postage every day, but cannot let pass the congratulations of sister, brother, and “Silk Cloak,” all most cordial on your change of place.  Rogers approving, who can demur?  Tell me when you get into Dover St. and what the No. is—­that I may change foolscap for gilt, and plain Mr. for Esqr.  I shall Mister you while you stay—­

If you are not too great to attend to it, I wish us to do without the Sonnets of Sydney:  12 will take up as many pages, and be too palpable a fill up.  Perhaps we may leave them out, retaining the article, but that is not worth saving.  I hope you liked my Cervantes Article which I sent you yesterday.

Not an inapt quotation, for your fallen predecessor in Albemarle Street, to whom you must give the coup du main—­

Murray, long enough his country’s pride.

Pope.

[Then, written at the bottom of the page] there’s [and written on the next page] there’s nothing over here.

[Moxon was moving from 64 New Bond Street to 33 Dover Street.

“Silk Cloak” would, I imagine, probably be a name for Emma Isola.

“The Sonnets of Sydney”—­Lamb’s Elia essay on this subject.  It was not omitted from the Last Essay, which Moxon was to publish, and eleven sonnets were quoted.

“Your fallen predecessor.”  It is hardly needful to say that Moxon made very little difference to Murray’s business.  The line is from Pope’s Sixth Epistle of the First Book of Horace.  To Mr. Murray, who afterwards was Earl of Mansfield.]

LETTER 560

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The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb — Volume 6 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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