The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb — Volume 6 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 491 pages of information about The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb Volume 6.

In the name of dear Defoe which alone might be a Bond of Union between us, Adieu!

[Mrs. Hazlitt was the wife of John Hazlitt, the miniature painter, who died in 1837.  I have been unable to trace her daughter’s history.

Collet I do not recognise.  Probably an old fellow-clerk at the India House, as was Du Puy.  It is true that Hone was converted by Irving, and became himself a preacher.]

LETTER 548

CHARLES LAMB TO HENRY CRABB ROBINSON

[No date. ?  Early October, 1832.]

For Lander’s kindness I have just esteem.  I shall tip him a Letter, when you tell me how to address him.

Give Emma’s kindest regrets that I could not entice her good friend, your Nephew, here.

Her warmest love to the Bury Robinsons—­our all three to

H. Crab.  C.L.

[Mr. Macdonald’s transcript adds:  “Accompanying copy of Lander’s verses to Emma Isola, and others, contributed to Miss Wordsworth’s Album, and poem written at Wast-water.  C.L.”

The Bury Robinsons were Crabb Robinson’s brother and other relatives, whom Miss Isola had met when at Fornham.]

LETTER 549

CHARLES LAMB TO WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR

[No date.  October, 1832.]

Dear Sir, pray accept a little volume.  ’Tis a legacy from Elia, you’ll see.  Silver and Gold had he none, but such as he had, left he you.  I do not know how to thank you for attending to my request about the Album.  I thought you would never remember it.  Are not you proud and thankful, Emma?

Yes, very, both—­ EMMA ISOLA.

Many things I had to say to you, which there was not time for. One why should I forget? ’tis for Rose Aylmer, which has a charm I cannot explain.  I lived upon it for weeks.—­

Next I forgot to tell you I knew all your Welch annoyancers, the measureless Beethams.  I knew a quarter of a mile of them. 17 brothers and 16 sisters, as they appear to me in memory.  There was one of them that used to fix his long legs on my fender, and tell a story of a shark, every night, endless, immortal.  How have I grudged the salt sea ravener not having had his gorge of him!

The shortest of the daughters measured 5 foot eleven without her shoes.  Well, some day we may confer about them.  But they were tall.  Surely I have discover’d the longitude—­

Sir, If you can spare a moment, I should be happy to hear from you—­that rogue Robinson detained your verses, till I call’d for them.  Don’t entrust a bit of prose to the rogue, but believe me

Your obliged C.L.

My Sister sends her kind regards.

[Crabb Robinson took Landor to see Lamb on September 28, 1832.  The following passage in Forster’s Life of Landor describes the visit and explains this letter:—­

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The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb — Volume 6 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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