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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 491 pages of information about The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb Volume 6.

C.L.

["Out of a life of sixty-four.”  Mary Lamb was born December 3, 1764.

“Your kind ...  Eliza”—­Eliza Barton, Bernard’s sister.

“Rejected farce.”  “The Pawnbroker’s Daughter” was printed in Blackwood, January, 1830.

“I brag’d formerly.”  Referring I think to his sonnet “Leisure.”]

LETTER 490

CHARLES LAMB TO THOMAS ALLSOP

[No date.  Late July, 1829.]

My dear Allsop—­I thank you for thinking of my recreation.  But I am best here, I feel I am.  I have tried town lately, but came back worse.  Here I must wait till my loneliness has its natural cure.  Besides that, though I am not very sanguine, yet I live in hopes of better news from Fulham, and can not be out of the way.  ’Tis ten weeks to-morrow.—­I saw Mary a week since, she was in excellent bodily health, but otherwise far from well.  But a week or so may give a turn.  Love to Mrs. A. and children, and fair weather accomp’y you.

C.L.

Tuesday.

LETTER 491

CHARLES LAMB TO EDWARD MOXON

[P.M.  Sept. 22, 1829.]

Dear Moxon, If you can oblige me with the Garrick Papers or Ann of Gierstien, I shall be thankful.  I am almost fearful whether my Sister will be able to enjoy any reading at present for since her coming home, after 12 weeks, she has had an unusual relapse into the saddest low spirits that ever poor creature had, and has been some weeks under medical care.  She is unable to see any yet.  When she is better I shall be very glad to talk over your ramble with you.  Have you done any sonnets, can you send me any to overlook?  I am almost in despair, Mary’s case seems so hopeless.

Believe me

Yours

C.L.

I do not want Mr. Jameson or Lady Morgan.

Enfield

Wedn’y

["The Garrick Papers.”  Lamb refers, I suppose, to the Private Correspondence of David Garrick, in some form previous to its publication in 1832.

“Anne of Geierstein.”  Scott’s novel was published this year.

“Mr. Jameson.”  I cannot find any book by a Mr. Jameson likely to have been offered to Lamb; but Mrs. Jameson’s Loves of the Poets was published this year.  Probably he meant to write Mrs. Jameson.  Lady Morgan was the author of The Wild Irish Girl and other novels.  Her 1829 book was The Book of the Boudoir.]

LETTER 492

CHARLES LAMB TO JAMES GILLMAN

Chase-Side, Enfield, 26th Oct., 1829.

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