The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb — Volume 6 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 491 pages of information about The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb Volume 6.

[No date. 1821.]

Dear Sir—­The hairs of our head are numbered, but those which emanate from your heart defy arithmetic.  I would send longer thanks but your young man is blowing his fingers in the Passage.

Yours gratefully C.L.

[The date of this scrap is unimportant; but it comes well here in connection with the reference in the preceding letter.

In Harper’s Magazine for December, 1859, were printed fifty of Lamb’s notes to Allsop, all of which are reproduced in at least two editions of Lamb’s letters.  I have selected only those which say anything, as for the most part Lamb was content with the merest message; moreover, the date is often so uncertain as to be only misleading.

Crabb Robinson says of Allsop, “I believe his acquaintance with Lamb originated in his sending Coleridge a present of L100 in admiration of his genius.”]

LETTER 266

CHARLES LAMB TO THOMAS ALLSOP

[No date. 1821.]

D’r Sir—­Thanks for the Birds and your kindness.  It was but yesterd’y.  I was contriving with Talf’d to meet you 1/2 way at his chamber.  But night don’t do so well at present.  I shall want to be home at Dalston by Eight.

I will pay an afternoon visit to you when you please.  I dine at a chop-house at ONE always, but I can spend an hour with you after that.

Yours truly

C.L.

Would Saturdy serve?

LETTER 267

CHARLES LAMB TO MRS. WILLIAM AYRTON

[Dated at end:  Jan. 23, 1821.]

Dear Mrs. Ayrton, my sister desires me, as being a more expert penman than herself, to say that she saw Mrs. Paris yesterday, and that she is very much out of spirits, and has expressed a great wish to see your son William, and Fanny—­

I like to write that word Fanny.  I do not know but it was one reason of taking upon me this pleasing task—­

Moreover that if the said William and Frances will go and sit an hour with her at any time, she will engage that no one else shall see them but herself, and the servant who opens the door, she being confined to her private room.  I trust you and the Juveniles will comply with this reasonable request.

& am
Dear Mrs. Ayrton
your’s and yours’
Truly
C. LAMB. 
Cov.  Gar.
23 Jan. 1821.

[Mrs. Ayrton (nee Arnold) was the wife of William Ayrton, the musical critic.]

LETTER 268

CHARLES LAMB TO MISS HUMPHREYS

London 27 Jan’y. 1821.

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The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb — Volume 6 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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