Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 491 pages of information about The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb Volume 6.

“Dream on J. Bunyan.”  Probably a poem by Barton, but I have not traced it.

“T. and H.”—­Taylor & Hessey.

“Poor Scott”—­John Scott, who founded the London Magazine.

“Darley”—­George Darley (1795-1846), author of Sylvia; or, The May Queen, 1827.

“The Queen of the East Angles.”  Possibly Lucy Barton, possibly Anne Knight, a friend of Barton’s.]

LETTER 364

CHARLES LAMB TO THOMAS MANNING

[Not dated. ?  February, 1825.]

My dear M.,—­You might have come inopportunely a week since, when we had an inmate.  At present and for as long as ever you like, our castle is at your service.  I saw Tuthill yesternight, who has done for me what may

“To all my nights and days to come,
Give solely sovran sway and masterdom.”

But I dare not hope, for fear of disappointment.  I cannot be more explicit at present.  But I have it under his own hand, that I am non-capacitated (I cannot write it in-) for business.  O joyous imbecility!  Not a susurration of this to anybody!

Mary’s love.

C. LAMB.

[Lamb had just taken a most momentous step in his career and had consulted Tuthill as to his health, in the hope of perhaps obtaining release and a pension from the East India House.  We learn more of this soon.

Here might come two brief notes to Dibdin, of no importance.]

LETTER 365

CHARLES LAMB TO SARAH HUTCHINSON

[Dated at end:  March 1, 1825.]

Dear Miss Hutchinson Your news has made us all very sad.  I had my hopes to the last.  I seem as if I were disturbing you at such an awful time even by a reply.  But I must acknowledge your kindness in presuming upon the interest we shall all feel on the subject.  No one will more feel it than Robinson, to whom I have written.  No one more than he and we acknowleged the nobleness and worth of what we have lost.  Words are perfectly idle.  We can only pray for resignation to the Survivors.  Our dearest expressions of condolence to Mrs. M------ at this time in particular.  God bless you both.  I have nothing of ourselves to tell you, and if I had, I could not be so unreverent as to trouble you with it.  We are all well, that is all.  Farewell, the departed—­and the left.  Your’s and his, while memory survives, cordially

C. LAMB.

1 Mar. 1825.

[The letter refers to the death of Thomas Monkhouse.

Here should come an undated note from Lamb to Procter, in which Lamb refers to the same loss:  “We shall be most glad to see you, though more glad to have seen double you.”]

LETTER 366

CHARLES LAMB TO BERNARD BARTON

[P.M.  March 23, 1825.]

Follow Us on Facebook