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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 665 pages of information about A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels Volume 02.

[6] In Lichefilds translation of Castaneda, this date is made the 27th
    September, which is an obvious mistake.—­E.

[7] By some strange blunder, Lichefild says they came to Cananor; but
    from all the circumstances in the contexts, it is obvious that the
    fleet came to anchor on the outside of the bar at Pandarane.—­E.

[8] Arabs probably, whites in the estimation of the Portuguese as
    compared with the native blacks of Malabar.—­E.

[9] This part of the story is very confusedly translated by Lichefild. 
    According to his relation, in one sense, the admiral alone returned in
    his boat for the caravels; while, by another part of his expressions,
    the whole boats returned for the admiral and the caravels.—­E.

[10] According to Astley, a peace was concluded between the Portuguese
    and the zamorin immediately after the victory obtained by the rajah of
    Tanore; but this does not agree with the circumstances just related
    respecting the destruction of the Moorish fleet in the harbour of
    Pandarane, which would hardly have been done during a time of peace—­E.

[11] By some strange typographical mistake, Lichefild makes this date
    1525, both in the text and in a marginal note, thus adding no less
    than twenty years to the true chronology.  In Astleys Collection, the
    conclusion of this voyage is dated 22d July 1506; but we have chosen
    to retain the regular series of dates as given by Castaneda.  Owing to
    the mistake in Lichefilds translation not being detected till a part
    of this chapter was printed off, it has been repeated in our
    introduction to this article, which our readers are requested to
    correct.—­E.

[12] In Astley, the ship commanded by Pedro Mendoza, is said to have been
    stranded during the homeward voyage, fourteen leagues from the
    Aguada, or watering-place of St Blas, and never more heard of.—­Astl. 
    I. 58.

[13] Astley concludes the account of the honours conferred on Pacheco in
    the following words:  “But soon after imprisoned, and allowed him to
    die miserably.  A terrible example of the uncertainty of royal favour,
    and the little regard that is had to true merit!”—­Astl.  I. 58.

CHAPTER VII.

LETTERS FROM LISBON IN THE BEGINNING OF THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY, RESPECTING
THE THEN RECENT DISCOVERY OF THE ROUTE BY SEA TO INDIA.[1]

INTRODUCTION.

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