A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels — Volume 02 eBook

Robert Kerr (writer)
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 665 pages of information about A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels Volume 02.

[1] This seems to be the island named Chirapipil on a former occasion.—­E.

[2] Thus I understand the expression in Lichefilds translation of
    Castaneda, “Forty were armed with, shot.”—­E.

[3] Caliver is the old name of the matchlock or carabine, the precursor
    of the modern firelock or musket.—­E.

[4] A very ordinary precaution in India, to guard the passage of the wet
    ditch in fortified places, both against desertion and surprise, is by
    keeping numbers of crocodiles in the water.—­E.

[5] A falcon or faulcon is described as a small cannon of two pound shot. 
    The following enumeration of the ancient English ordnance, from Sir
    William Monsons Naval Tracts, in the reigns of Elizabeth and James the
    First, is given in Churchills Collection, Vol.  III. p. 803.  I suspect
    the weight of the basilisk, marked 400 pounds in this list, may be a
    typographical error for 4000.—­E.

Names.              Bore.     Weight.    Shot.     Powder.      Random
inches.    libs.    libs.     libs.       paces. 
Cannon-royal       8-1/2    8000       66        30          1930
Cannon             8        6000       60        27          2000
Cannon-serpentine  7        5500       53-1/2    25          2000
Bastard cannon     7        4500       41        20          1800
Demi-cannon        6-3/4    4000       30-1/2    18          1700
Cannon-petro       6        3000       24-1/2    14          1600
Culverin           5-1/2    4500       17-1/2    12          2500
Basilisk           5         400*      15        10          3000
Demi-culverin      4        3400        9-1/2     8          2500
Bastard culverin   4        3000        5         5-3/4      1700
Sacar              3-1/2    1400        5-1/2     5-1/2      1700
Minion             3-1/2    1000        4         4          1500
Faulcon            2-1/2     660        2         3-1/2      1500
Falconet           2         500        1-1/2     3          1500
Serpentine         1-1/2     400          3/4     1-1/2      1400
Rabanet            1         300          1/2       1/3      1000

[6] Two weights of that name are described as used in India for the sale
    of pepper and other commodities, the small and the large bahar; the
    former consisting of three, and the latter of four and a half peculs. 
    The pecul is said to weigh 5 1/2 pounds avoirdupois:  Consequently the
    smaller bahar is equal to 16 1/2, and the larger to 24 3/4 English
    pounds.  A little farther on in the present work of Castaneda, 4000
    bahars are said to equal 1200 quintals; which would make the bahar of
    Cochin equal to thirty Portuguese pounds.—­E.

[7] This is a species of bark of some burthen, then used on the Malabar
    coast.—­E.

[8] Such is the expression of Lichefild; which I suspect ought to have
    been 500 nayres of Cochin in paraws.—­E.

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