A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels — Volume 02 eBook

Robert Kerr (writer)
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 665 pages of information about A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels Volume 02.

[6] This is now called Cape Tagrin, and forms the northern point at the
    entrance of the Sierra Leone river, otherwise called the Mitomba or
    Tagrin river.  The southern point is named Cape Sierra Leone; and in
    some maps is likewise named Liedo very improperly.  It is necessary to
    distinguish carefully between the Cape of Sierra Leone, and the
    mountainous ridge of the same name, which appears to extend a
    considerable way along the coast to the S. E. near fifty miles, to the
    river Kates, or Sa.  Ma. della Neue.  But, from the baldness of the
    narrative, there is great difficulty in tracing out this voyage.—­E.

[7] These are now called Bananas islands, in lat. 8 deg.  N.—­E.

[8] Perhaps the Camaranca.—­E.

[9] Probably that now called Tassa Point, or Cabo de S. Anna.—­E.

[10] This account seems again to refer to the river Camaranca and Tassa
    Point; otherwise called Cape St Ann; yet this cape is brought in
    immediately afterwards.  Indeed this voyage is inextricably confused,
    probably incorrect or corrupt.—­E.

[11] The large island of Sherbro, with Sherbro Strand and Shoals, a very
    prominent feature of this part of the African coast, is here entirely
    overlooked; unless we suppose de Cintra to have gone on the outside of
    that island, considering the sound as a river, and naming the N. W.
    point of Sherbro island Cape St Ann.—­E.

[12] We have already seen that Don Henry died in this year, which must,
    therefore, be here an error of the press, either in the original
    publication by Cada Mosto, or in some of the after editions.—­E.

CHAPTER V.

CONTINUATION OF THE PORTUGUESE DISCOVERIES ALONG THE COAST OF AFRICA,
FROM THE DEATH OF DON HENRY IN 1463, TO THE DISCOVERY OF THE CAPE OF GOOD
HOPE IN 1486[1].

SECTION I.

Progress of Discovery from Cape Verga to Cape St Catherine; from the Death of Don Henry to that of King Alphonzo V.

After the decease of Don Henry, the illustrious father of maritime discovery, the progress of the Portuguese along the coast of Africa received a considerable check, as the military ardour of Alphonzo the Fifth was principally directed to the support of his pretensions to the throne of Castile, the circumstances of which are unconnected with the plan of this work.  King Alphonzo was not however entirely inattentive to the trade for gold and slaves, which his illustrious uncle Don Henry had commenced with that part of Africa which is now called Guinea.  The origin of this name of Guinea, or Ghinney, is unknown.  It is not in use among the natives, and seems to have been imposed by the Portuguese from the appellation of Ghenchoa, given to a country on the south side

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