The Anatomy of Melancholy eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,594 pages of information about The Anatomy of Melancholy.

  Tending to evil, as
      Leanness, dryness, hollow-eyed, &c. 
      Inveterate melancholy is incurable. 
      If cold, it degenerates often into epilepsy, apoplexy, dotage, or
        into blindness. 
      If hot, into madness, despair, and violent death.

  Corollaries and questions. 
      The grievousness of this above all other diseases. 
      The diseases of the mind are more grievous than those of the body. 
      Whether it be lawful, in this case of melancholy, for a man to offer
        violence to himself. Neg.
      How a melancholy or mad man offering violence to himself, is to be
        censured.

THE FIRST PARTITION.

THE FIRST SECTION, MEMBER, SUBSECTION.
Man’s Excellency, Fall, Miseries, Infirmities; The causes of them.

Man’s Excellency.] Man the most excellent and noble creature of the world, “the principal and mighty work of God, wonder of Nature,” as Zoroaster calls him; audacis naturae miraculum, “the [820]marvel of marvels,” as Plato; “the [821]abridgment and epitome of the world,” as Pliny; microcosmus, a little world, a model of the world, [822]sovereign lord of the earth, viceroy of the world, sole commander and governor of all the creatures in it; to whose empire they are subject in particular, and yield obedience; far surpassing all the rest, not in body only, but in soul; [823]_imaginis imago_, [824]created to God’s own [825]image, to that immortal and incorporeal substance, with all the faculties and powers belonging unto it; was at first pure, divine, perfect, happy, [826] “created after God in true holiness and righteousness;” Deo congruens, free from all manner of infirmities, and put in Paradise, to know God, to praise and glorify him, to do his will, Ut diis consimiles parturiat deos (as an old poet saith) to propagate the church.

Man’s Fall and Misery.] But this most noble creature, Heu tristis, et lachrymosa commutatio ([827]one exclaims) O pitiful change! is fallen from that he was, and forfeited his estate, become miserabilis homuncio, a castaway, a caitiff, one of the most miserable creatures of the world, if he be considered in his own nature, an unregenerate man, and so much obscured by his fall that (some few relics excepted) he is inferior to a beast, [828]"Man in honour that understandeth not, is like unto beasts that perish,” so David esteems him:  a monster by stupend metamorphoses, [829]a fox, a dog, a hog, what not? Quantum mutatus ab illo?  How much altered from that he was; before blessed and happy, now miserable and accursed; [830]"He must eat his meat in sorrow,” subject to death and all manner of infirmities, all kind of calamities.

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The Anatomy of Melancholy from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.