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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 76 pages of information about YorkshireCoast & Moorland Scenes.

CHAPTER I ACROSS THE MOORS FROM PICKERING TO WHITBY

Chapter II
  along the Esk valley

Chapter III
  the coast from Whitby to Redcar

Chapter IV
  the coast from Whitby to Scarborough

Chapter V
  Scarborough

Chapter VI
  Whitby

Chapter VII
  the Cleveland hills

Chapter VIII
  Guisborough and the Skelton valley

Chapter IX
  from Pickering to Rievaulx abbey

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

  1.  On Barnby Moor
  2.  Goathland Moor
  3.  An Autumn Scene on the Esk
  4.  Sleights Moor from Swart Houc Cross
  5.  A Stormy Afternoon
  6.  East Row, Sandsend
  7.  In Mulgrave Woods
  8.  Runswick Bay
  9.  A Sunny Afternoon at Runswick
 10.  Sunrise from Staithes Beck
 11.  Three Generations at Staithes
 12.  Boulby Cliffs from Staithes Scaur
 13.  The Coast at Saltburn
 14.  Whitby Abbey from the Cliffs
 15.  Robin Hood’s Bay
 16.  A Street in Robin Hood’s Bay
 17.  Scarborough Harbour and Castle
 18.  Sunlight and Shadows in Whitby Harbour
 19.  The Red Roofs of Whitby
 20.  Evening at Whitby
 21.  The Cleveland Hills from above Kildale
 22.  Hutton Woods, near Guisborough
 23.  A Wide Expanse of Heather seen from Great Ayton Moor
 24.  A Golden Afternoon, Danby
 25.  A Sunset from Danby Beacon
 26.  An Autumn Day at Guisborough
 27.  A Yorkshire Postman
 28.  The Skelton Valley
 29.  In Pickering Church
 30.  The Market-place, Helmsley
 31.  Rievaulx Abbey from ‘The Terrace’

Map at end of volume

CHAPTER I

ACROSS THE MOORS FROM PICKERING TO WHITBY

The ancient stone-built town of Pickering is to a great extent the gateway to the moors of Northeastern Yorkshire, for it stands at the foot of that formerly inaccessible gorge known as Newton Dale, and is the meeting-place of the four great roads running north, south, east, and west, as well as of railways going in the same directions.  And this view of the little town is by no means original, for the strategic importance of the position was recognised at least as long ago as the days of the early Edwards, when the castle was built to command the approach to Newton Dale and to be a menace to the whole of the Vale of Pickering.

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