The Story of the Other Wise Man eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 36 pages of information about The Story of the Other Wise Man.

But Abgarus, the oldest and the one who loved Artaban the best, lingered after the others had gone, and said, gravely:  “My son, it may be that the light of truth is in this sign that has appeared in the skies, and then it will surely lead to the Prince and the mighty brightness.  Or it may be that it is only a shadow of the light, as Tigranes has said, and then he who follows it will have only a long pilgrimage and an empty search.  But it is better to follow even the shadow of the best than to remain content with the worst.  And those who would see wonderful things must often be ready to travel alone.  I am too old for this journey, but my heart shall be a companion of the pilgrimage day and night, and I shall know the end of thy quest.  Go in peace.”

So one by one they went out of the azure chamber with its silver stars, and Artaban was left in solitude.

He gathered up the jewels and replaced them in his girdle.  For a long time he stood and watched the flame that flickered and sank upon the altar.  Then he crossed the hall, lifted the heavy curtain, and passed out between the dull red pillars of porphyry to the terrace on the roof.

The shiver that thrills through the earth ere she rouses from her night sleep had already begun, and the cool wind that heralds the daybreak was drawing downward from the lofty snow-traced ravines of Mount Orontes.  Birds, half awakened, crept and chirped among the rustling leaves, and the smell of ripened grapes came in brief wafts from the arbours.

Far over the eastern plain a white mist stretched like a lake.  But where the distant peak of Zagros serrated the western horizon the sky was clear.  Jupiter and Saturn rolled together like drops of lambent flame about to blend in one.

As Artaban watched them, behold, an azure spark was born out of the darkness beneath, rounding itself with purple splendours to a crimson sphere, and spiring upward through rays of saffron and orange into a point of white radiance.  Tiny and infinitely remote, yet perfect in every part, it pulsated in the enormous vault as if the three jewels in the Magian’s breast had mingled and been transformed into a living heart of light.  He bowed his head.  He covered his brow with his hands.

“It is the sign,” he said.  “The King is coming, and I will go to meet him.”

BY THE WATERS OF BABYLON

All night long Vasda, the swiftest of Artaban’s horses, had been waiting, saddled and bridled, in her stall, pawing the ground impatiently, and shaking her bit as if she shared the eagerness of her master’s purpose, though she knew not its meaning.

Before the birds had fully roused to their strong, high, joyful chant of morning song, before the white mist had begun to lift lazily from the plain, the other wise man was in the saddle, riding swiftly along the high-road, which skirted the base of Mount Orontes, westward.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Story of the Other Wise Man from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook