Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant — Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 453 pages of information about Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant — Volume 1.

The 20th and 21st were spent in strengthening our position and in making roads in rear of the army, from Yazoo River or Chickasaw Bayou.  Most of the army had now been for three weeks with only five days’ rations issued by the commissary.  They had an abundance of food, however, but began to feel the want of bread.  I remember that in passing around to the left of the line on the 21st, a soldier, recognizing me, said in rather a low voice, but yet so that I heard him, “Hard tack.”  In a moment the cry was taken up all along the line, “Hard tack!  Hard tack!” I told the men nearest to me that we had been engaged ever since the arrival of the troops in building a road over which to supply them with everything they needed.  The cry was instantly changed to cheers.  By the night of the 21st all the troops had full rations issued to them.  The bread and coffee were highly appreciated.

I now determined on a second assault.  Johnston was in my rear, only fifty miles away, with an army not much inferior in numbers to the one I had with me, and I knew he was being reinforced.  There was danger of his coming to the assistance of Pemberton, and after all he might defeat my anticipations of capturing the garrison if, indeed, he did not prevent the capture of the city.  The immediate capture of Vicksburg would save sending me the reinforcements which were so much wanted elsewhere, and would set free the army under me to drive Johnston from the State.  But the first consideration of all was—­the troops believed they could carry the works in their front, and would not have worked so patiently in the trenches if they had not been allowed to try.

The attack was ordered to commence on all parts of the line at ten o’clock A.M. on the 22d with a furious cannonade from every battery in position.  All the corps commanders set their time by mine so that all might open the engagement at the same minute.  The attack was gallant, and portions of each of the three corps succeeded in getting up to the very parapets of the enemy and in planting their battle flags upon them; but at no place were we able to enter.  General McClernand reported that he had gained the enemy’s intrenchments at several points, and wanted reinforcements.  I occupied a position from which I believed I could see as well as he what took place in his front, and I did not see the success he reported.  But his request for reinforcements being repeated I could not ignore it, and sent him Quinby’s division of the 17th corps.  Sherman and McPherson were both ordered to renew their assaults as a diversion in favor of McClernand.  This last attack only served to increase our casualties without giving any benefit whatever.  As soon as it was dark our troops that had reached the enemy’s line and been obliged to remain there for security all day, were withdrawn; and thus ended the last assault upon Vicksburg.

CHAPTER XXXVII

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