Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant — Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 453 pages of information about Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant — Volume 1.

The State government of Kentucky at that time was rebel in sentiment, but wanted to preserve an armed neutrality between the North and the South, and the governor really seemed to think the State had a perfect right to maintain a neutral position.  The rebels already occupied two towns in the State, Columbus and Hickman, on the Mississippi; and at the very moment the National troops were entering Paducah from the Ohio front, General Lloyd Tilghman—­a Confederate—­with his staff and a small detachment of men, were getting out in the other direction, while, as I have already said, nearly four thousand Confederate troops were on Kentucky soil on their way to take possession of the town.  But, in the estimation of the governor and of those who thought with him, this did not justify the National authorities in invading the soil of Kentucky.  I informed the legislature of the State of what I was doing, and my action was approved by the majority of that body.  On my return to Cairo I found authority from department headquarters for me to take Paducah “if I felt strong enough,” but very soon after I was reprimanded from the same quarters for my correspondence with the legislature and warned against a repetition of the offence.

Soon after I took command at Cairo, General Fremont entered into arrangements for the exchange of the prisoners captured at Camp Jackson in the month of May.  I received orders to pass them through my lines to Columbus as they presented themselves with proper credentials.  Quite a number of these prisoners I had been personally acquainted with before the war.  Such of them as I had so known were received at my headquarters as old acquaintances, and ordinary routine business was not disturbed by their presence.  On one occasion when several were present in my office my intention to visit Cape Girardeau the next day, to inspect the troops at that point, was mentioned.  Something transpired which postponed my trip; but a steamer employed by the government was passing a point some twenty or more miles above Cairo, the next day, when a section of rebel artillery with proper escort brought her to.  A major, one of those who had been at my headquarters the day before, came at once aboard and after some search made a direct demand for my delivery.  It was hard to persuade him that I was not there.  This officer was Major Barrett, of St. Louis.  I had been acquainted with his family before the war.

CHAPTER XX.

General Fremont in command—­movement against Belmont—­battle of Belmont —­A narrow escape—­after the battle.

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