The History of the Rise, Progress and Accomplishment of the Abolition of the African Slave-Trade, by the British Parliament (1839) eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 827 pages of information about The History of the Rise, Progress and Accomplishment of the Abolition of the African Slave-Trade, by the British Parliament (1839).
to see if those in question were willing to undergo the change; and in that case to provide transports, and conduct them to Sierra Leone.  This object he accomplished.  He embarked more than eleven hundred persons in fifteen vessels, of all which he took the command.  On landing them he became the first Governor of the new colony.  Having laid the foundation of it, he returned to England; when a successor was appointed.  From that time many unexpected circumstances, but particularly devastations by the French in the beginning of the war, took place, which contributed to ruin the trading company which was attached to it.  It is pleasing, however, to reflect, that though the object of the institution, as far as mercantile profit was concerned, thus failed, the other objects belonging to it were promoted.  Schools, places of worship, agriculture, and the habits of civilized life were established.  Sierra Leone, therefore, now presents itself as the medium of civilization for Africa.  And, in this latter point of view, it is worth all the treasure which has been lost in supporting it; for the Slave Trade, which was the great obstacle to this civilization, being now happily abolished, there is a metropolis, consisting of some hundreds of persons, from which may issue the seeds of reformation to this injured continent; and which, when sown, may be expected to grow into fruit without interruption.  New schools may be transplanted from thence into the interior.  Teachers, and travellers on discovery, may be sent from thence in various directions, who may return to it occasionally as to their homes.  The natives, too, able now to travel in safety, may resort to it from various parts.  They may see the improvements which are going on from time to time.  They may send their children to it for education; and thus it may become the medium[A] of a great intercourse between England and Africa, to the benefit of each other.

[Footnote A:  To promote this desirable end an association took place last year, called The African Institution, under the patronage of the Duke of Gloucester, as president, and of the Mends to the African cause, particularly of such as were in parliament, and as belonged to the committee for the abolition of the Slave Trade.]

CHAPTER XXVII.

[Sidenote:—­Continuation from July 1791 to July 1792.—­Author travels round the kingdom again; object of his journey.—­People begin to leave off the use of sugar; to form committees; and to send petitions to Parliament.—­Motion made in the House of Commons for the immediate abolition of the trade; Debates upon it; Abolition resolved upon, but not to commence till 1796.—­Resolution taken to the Lords; latter determine upon hearing evidence; Evidence at length introduced; further hearing of it postponed to the next session.]

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