Cap and Gown eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 91 pages of information about Cap and Gown.

How shall you know her?  By her sunny hair,
Her grave, sweet eyes, all pure, no evil knowing: 
Oh, robin! thou wilt turn to watch her going;
There is no maid in all the land so fair.

Shy violets among the tangled grass,
Shed forth your richest perfumes ’neath her feet! 
And gallant robin, when thou seest her pass,
Trill out thy merriest lay her ears to greet;
And elm-tree branches, drooping low above her,
Whisper to her that I came by and love her.

LOUISE R. LOOMIS.
Wellesley Magazine.

[Illustration:  A WELLESLEY GIRL.]

"A White Morning"

Many a morning the trees’ slim fingers
  Lift to the blue their frosted tips;
Winter has paused beside them, passing,
  And blown upon them, through icy lips.

After the day has dawned in earnest,
  Comes a blaze from the soul of things. 
Some small snow-bird, beneath the window,
  Beats out life, from his restless wings.

Never trust to the cold and silence;
  Suns will rise, and the day climb higher. 
Under the snows are resurrections;
  Under the frost is hidden fire.

GRACE W. LEACH.
Madisonensis.

V. IN SERIOUS MOOD

Verses.

What must be must be, little one,
  The dark night follow the day,
And the ebbing tide to the seaward glide
  Across the moonlit bay.

What must be must be, little one,
  The winter follow the fall,
And the prying wind an entrance find
  Through the chinks of the cottage wall.

What must be must be, little one,
  The brown hair turn to gray,
And the soul like the light of the early night
  Slip gently far away.

FORSYTH WICKES.
Yale Literary Magazine.

A Little Parable.

Just beyond the toiling town
  I saw a child to-day,
With busy little hands of brown
  Making toys of clay.

Working there with all his heart,
  Beneath the spreading trees,
He moulded with unconscious art
  Whatever seemed to please.

Men and fortress, plates and pies,
  All out of clay he made,
Then rubbed with chubby fists his eyes,
  And slumbered in the shade.

JOHN CLAIR MINOT.
Bowdoin Quill.

When Morning Breaks.

When morning breaks, what fortune waits for me? 
What ships shall rise from out the misty sea? 
  What friends shall clasp my hand in fond farewell? 
  What dream-wrought castles, as night’s clouds dispel,
Shall raise their sun-kissed towers upon the lea?

To-night the moon-queen shining wide and free,
To-night the sighing breeze, the song, and thee;
  But time is brief.  What cometh, who can tell,
    When morning breaks?

To-night, to-night, then happy let us be! 
To-night, to-night, life’s shadowy cares shall flee! 
  And though the dawn come in with chime or knell,
  When night recalls its last bright sentinel,
I shall, at least, have memories left to me,
    When morning breaks.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Cap and Gown from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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