Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 114 pages of information about Ballad of Reading Gaol.

Florence.

Poem:  Italia

Italia! thou art fallen, though with sheen
Of battle-spears thy clamorous armies stride
From the north Alps to the Sicilian tide! 
Ay! fallen, though the nations hail thee Queen
Because rich gold in every town is seen,
And on thy sapphire-lake in tossing pride
Of wind-filled vans thy myriad galleys ride
Beneath one flag of red and white and green. 
O Fair and Strong!  O Strong and Fair in vain! 
Look southward where Rome’s desecrated town
Lies mourning for her God-anointed King! 
Look heaven-ward! shall God allow this thing? 
Nay! but some flame-girt Raphael shall come down,
And smite the Spoiler with the sword of pain.

Venice.

Poem:  Holy Week At Genoa

I wandered through Scoglietto’s far retreat,
The oranges on each o’erhanging spray
Burned as bright lamps of gold to shame the day;
Some startled bird with fluttering wings and fleet
Made snow of all the blossoms; at my feet
Like silver moons the pale narcissi lay: 
And the curved waves that streaked the great green bay
Laughed i’ the sun, and life seemed very sweet. 
Outside the young boy-priest passed singing clear,
’Jesus the son of Mary has been slain,
O come and fill His sepulchre with flowers.’ 
Ah, God!  Ah, God! those dear Hellenic hours
Had drowned all memory of Thy bitter pain,
The Cross, the Crown, the Soldiers and the Spear.

Poem:  Rome Unvisited

I.

The corn has turned from grey to red,
Since first my spirit wandered forth
From the drear cities of the north,
And to Italia’s mountains fled.

And here I set my face towards home,
For all my pilgrimage is done,
Although, methinks, yon blood-red sun
Marshals the way to Holy Rome.

O Blessed Lady, who dost hold
Upon the seven hills thy reign! 
O Mother without blot or stain,
Crowned with bright crowns of triple gold!

O Roma, Roma, at thy feet
I lay this barren gift of song! 
For, ah! the way is steep and long
That leads unto thy sacred street.

II.

And yet what joy it were for me
To turn my feet unto the south,
And journeying towards the Tiber mouth
To kneel again at Fiesole!

And wandering through the tangled pines
That break the gold of Arno’s stream,
To see the purple mist and gleam
Of morning on the Apennines

By many a vineyard-hidden home,
Orchard and olive-garden grey,
Till from the drear Campagna’s way
The seven hills bear up the dome!

III.

Follow Us on Facebook