A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Volume 9 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 508 pages of information about A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Volume 9.

PAGE. 
Hang me, if he hath any more mathematics than will serve to count the
clock, or tell the meridian hour by rumbling of his paunch.
          
                                                  [Aside.

AMORETTO.
Her nose is like ——­

PAGE. 
A cobbler’s shoeing-horn.

AMORETTO.
Her nose is like a beauteous maribone. [Aside.

PAGE. 
Marry, a sweet snotty mistress! [Aside.

AMORETTO. 
Faith, I do not like it yet.  Ass as I was, to read a piece of Aristotle
in Greek yesternight; it hath put me out of my English vein quite.

PAGE. 
O monstrous lie! let me be a point-trusser, while I live, if he
understands any tongue but English. [Aside.

AMORETTO.  Sirrah boy, remember me when I come in Paul’s Churchyard to buy a Ronsard and [a] Dubartas in French, and Aretine in Italian; and our hardest writers in Spanish; they will sharpen my wits gallantly.  I do relish these tongues in some sort.  O, now I do remember, I hear a report of a poet newly come out in Hebrew; it is a pretty harsh tongue, and telleth[97] a gentleman traveller:  but come, let’s haste after my father; the fields are fitter to heavenly meditations.
          
                                              [Exit.

PAGE.  My masters, I could wish your presence at an admirable jest:  why presently this great linguist my master will march through Paul’s Churchyard, come to a bookbinder’s shop, and with a big Italian look and a Spanish face ask for these books in Spanish and Italian; then, turning (through his ignorance) the wrong end of the book upward, use action on this unknown tongue after this sort:  First, look on the title, and wrinkle his brow; next make as though he read the first page, and bite ’s lip;[98] then with his nail score the margent, as though there were some notable conceit; and, lastly, when he thinks he hath gulled the standers-by sufficiently, throws the book away in a rage, swearing that he could never find books of a true print since he was last in Joadna;[99] inquire after the next mart, and so departs.  And so must I; for by this time his contemplation is arrived at his mistress’s nose end; he is as glad as if he had taken Ostend.[100] By this time he begins to spit, and cry, Boy, carry my cloak:  and now I go to attend on his worship.

[Exit.

ACTUS III., SCAENA 4.

Enter INGENIOSO, FUROR, PHANTASMA.

INGENIOSO.  Come, lads; this wine whets your resolution in our design:  it’s a needy world with subtle spirits; and there’s a gentlemanlike kind of begging, that may beseem poets in this age.

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A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Volume 9 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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