A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Volume 9 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 508 pages of information about A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Volume 9.

[Exit HEURESIS.

LIN.  Mendacio, never talk farther, I doubt ’tis past recovery, and my robe likewise:  I shall never have them again.  Well, well.

PHA.  How? her crown and her robe, never recover them? hum, was it not said to be left by Mercury, ha?  I conjecture here’s some knavery,—­fast locked with sleep, in good faith.  Was that crown and garment yours, Lingua?

LIN.  Ay, marry were they, and that somebody hath felt, and shall feel more, if I live.

PHA.  O, strange, she answers in her sleep to my question:  but how come the Senses to strive for it?

LIN.  Why, I laid it on purpose in their way, that they might fall together by the ears.

PHA.  What a strange thing is this!

SCAENA DECIMA OCTAVA.

    The Senses, APPETITUS, and LINGUA, asleep
    PHANTASTES, COMMUNIS SENSUS, MEMORIA, ANAMNESTES.

PHA.  Hist, my lord:  softly, softly! here’s the notablest piece of treason discovered; how say you?  Lingua set all the Senses at odds, she hath confessed it to me in her sleep.

COM.  SEN.  Is’t possible, Master Register? did you ever know any talk in their sleep.

MEM.  I remember, my lord, many have done so very oft; but women are troubled especially with this talking disease; many of them have I heard answer in their dreams, and tell what they did all day awake.

ANA.  By the same token, there was a wanton maid, that being asked by her mother what such a one did with her so late one night in such a room, she presently said that—­

MEM.  Peace, you vile rake-hell, is such a jest fit for this company? no more, I say, sirrah.

PHA.  My lord, will you believe your own ears? you shall hear her answer me as directly and truly as may be.  Lingua, what did you with the crown and garments?

LIN.  I’ll tell thee, Mendacio.

PHA.  She thinks Mendacio speaks to her; mark now, mark how truly she will answer.  What say you, madam?

LIN.  I say Phantastes is a foolish, transparent gull; a mere fanatic napson[323], in my imagination not worthy to sit as a judge’s assistant.

COM.  SEN.  Ha, ha, ha! how truly and directly she answers.

PHA.  Faw, faw, she dreams now; she knows not what she says.  I’ll try her once again.  Madam, what remedy can you have for your great losses?

LIN.  O, are you come, Acrasia? welcome, welcome! boy, reach a cushion, sit down, good Acrasia:  I am so beholding to you, your potion wrought exceedingly; the Senses were so mad:  did not you see how they raged about the woods?

COM.  SEN.  Hum, Acrasia? is Acrasia her confederate? my life, that witch hath wrought some villainy. [LINGUA riseth in her sleep, and walketh.] How is this? is she asleep? have you seen one walk thus before?

MEM.  It is a very common thing; I have seen many sick of the peripatetic disease.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Volume 9 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook