A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Volume 9 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 508 pages of information about A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Volume 9.

LELIA. 
Then wish’d content knit up our nuptial right;
And future joys our former griefs requite.

WILL CRICKET.  Nay, and you be good at that, I’ll tell you what we’ll do:  Peg and I must be married to-morrow; and if you will, we’ll go all to the church together, and so save Sir John a labour.

ALL. 
Agreed.

FORTUNATUS. 
Then march along, and let’s be gone,
To solemnise two marriages in one.

[Exeunt omnes.

FINIS.

LINGUA.

EDITIONS.

(1.) Lingva:  Or, The Combat of the Tongue, And the fiue Senses for Superiority.  A pleasant Comoedie, At London Printed by G. Eld, for Simon Waterson, 1607, 4to[165].

(2.) Lingua:  or, The Combat of the Tongue, and the five Senses, for Superiority.  A pleasant Comoedie.  London, Printed by N. Okes, for Simon Waterson, [circa 1610], 4to.

(3.) Lingua; or, The Combat of the Tongue, and the five Senses, for Superiority.  A pleasant Comoedie.  London, Printed by Nicholas Okes, for Simon Waterson, 1617, 4to.

(4.) Lingua:  or, The Combat of the Tongue, and the five Sences, for Superiority.  A pleasant Comedy.  London, Printed by Nicholas Okes, for Simon Waterson, 1622, 4to.

(5.) Lingua:  or, The Combat of the Tongue, and the five Sences, for Superioritie.  A pleasant Comoedie.  London, Printed by Augustine Matthewes, for Simon Waterson, 1632, 4to.

(6.) Lingua:  or, The Combat of the Tongue, and the five Senses, for Superiority.  A pleasant Comoedy.  London, Printed for Simon Miller, at the Starre in St Paul’s Churchyard, 1657, 8vo.

INTRODUCTION

[Of the author of “Lingua” nothing is known.  By some of our earlier bibliographers the play was ascribed, without the slightest authority, to Anthony Brewer.

In the former edition it was pointed out that Winstanley gave to the same writer (among other pieces which he probably did not write) “Pathomachia; or, Love’s Loadstone,” published in 1630, upon which point Reed observes:—­“Whoever was the real author of ‘Lingua,’ there is some plausibility in assigning to him also ’Pathomachia; or, Love’s Lodestone,’ for they are certainly written upon the same plan, and very much in the same stile, although the former is considerably superior to the latter, both in design and execution.  The first scene of ‘Pathomachia’ contains an allusion by Pride, one of the characters, to ‘Lingua,’ where it is said, ’Methinks it were fit now to renew the claim to our old title of Affections, which we have lost, as sometimes Madame Lingua did to the title of a Sense, for it is good fishing in troubled waters.’

“‘Pathomachia’ was not printed until 1630, and most likely was not written until some years after ‘Lingua,’ from the allusion it contains in act ii. to the stile of the stage, and the mention in act i. of Coriat, the traveller, who did not become notorious until after the publication of his ‘Crudities’ in 1611....

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A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Volume 9 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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