A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Volume 9 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 508 pages of information about A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Volume 9.

HOW A MAN MAY CHOOSE A GOOD WIFE FROM A BAD.

EDITION

A Pleasant conceited Comedie, Wherein is shewed how a man may chuse a good Wife from a bad.  As it hath bene sundry times Acted by the Earle of Worcesters Seruants.  London Printed for Mathew Lawe, and are to be solde at his shop in Paules Church-yard, neare unto S. Augustines gate, at the signe of the Foxe_. 1602. 4to.

[There were editions in 1605, 1608, 1614, 1621, 1630, 1634, all in 4to.

It is not improbable that the author was Joshua Cooke, to whom, in an old hand on the title of edit. 1602 in the Museum, it is attributed.]

[Preface to the former edition.[1]]

This play agrees perfectly with the description given of it in the title; it is certainly a most pleasant conceited comedy, rich in humour, and written altogether in a right merry vein.  The humour is broad and strongly marked, and at the same time of the most diverting kind; the characters are excellent, and admirably discriminated; the comic parts of the play are written with most exquisite drollery, and the serious with great truth and feeling.  Of the present piece there were seven editions, within a short period, with all of which the present reprint has been carefully collated, and is now, for the first time, divided into acts and scenes.

PERSONS REPRESENTED.

Old master Arthur
Old master Lusam
Young master Arthur
Young master Lusam.[2]
Master Anselm
Master fuller
Sir Aminadab, a Schoolmaster
Justice reason
Brabo
Hugh, Justice Reason’s Servant
Pipkin, Master Arthur’s Servant.
Boys, Officers, &c
Mistress Arthur
Mistress Mary
Mistress splay
Maid.

Scene, London.

A PLEASANT CONCEITED COMEDY; WHEREIN IS SHOWED

HOW A MAN MAY CHOOSE A GOOD WIFE FROM A BAD.

ACT I., SCENE I.

    The Exchange.

    Enter young master Arthur and young master Lusam.

Y. Art.  I tell you true, sir; but to every man
I would not be so lavish of my speech: 
Only to you, my dear and private friend,
Although my wife in every eye be held
Of beauty and of grace sufficient,
Of honest birth and good behaviour,
Able to win the strongest thoughts to her,
Yet, in my mind, I hold her the most hated
And loathed object, that the world can yield.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Volume 9 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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