Children's Classics in Dramatic Form eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 92 pages of information about Children's Classics in Dramatic Form.

CAT.  Top-off.

MISS MOUSE.  Top-off?  Why, that is a curious name!  Is it common in your family?

CAT.  Oh, no!  My second child has a white ring around his neck.

MISS MOUSE.  Remarkable!

CAT.  Very!

MISS MOUSE.  What did you name him?

CAT.  I gave him an unusual name.  I will tell you what it is.  First, though, run out to see if your dear mother is coming.

[Miss Mouse nods and runs out.  The Cat creeps to the grease-pot and eats half the fat; then crosses to window. MISS MOUSE returns.]

MISS MOUSE.  Mother is nowhere to be seen.  Now what did you name your second child?

CAT.  Half-out.

Miss MOUSE.  Half-out?  I never heard such a name!  ’T is not in the calendar,
I’m sure.

CAT.  What does that matter, if it pleases me?  Now the last child is really a wonder.  He is quite black and has little white claws, but not a single white hair on his body.

MISS MOUSE.  What have you named him?

CAT.  I’m afraid that will please you no better than the others, but still I will tell you.  First, though, run to see if your dear mother is not coming.

[Miss Mouse nods and runs out.  The Cat creeps to the pot and eats all the fat.  She then crosses to the window.]

CAT.  What one begins one must needs finish.

[MISS MOUSE returns.]

MISS MOUSE.  Mother is nowhere to be seen.  Now tell me what you named your youngest child.

CAT.  All-out.

MISS MOUSE.  All-out?  Why, that is more curious than the others.  I have never seen it in print.

CAT (glaring at Miss Mouse).  You never will!

MISS MOUSE (frightened).  What do you mean?

CAT (preparing to spring).  I mean to put you down with the fat!

MISS MOUSE.  Help! help!

[Enter MOTHER MOUSE just as the Cat clutches her daughter and jumps out of the window with her.  Mother Mouse crosses and looks into the empty grease-pot.]

MOTHER MOUSE (sighing sadly).  ’T was ever thus!  Show your grease-pot, and you’ll go with it!

THE GIRL WHO TROD ON THE LOAF

SCENE I

TIME:  the day before Christmas.

PLACE:  Inge’s Mother’s home.

* * * * *

INGE. 
HER MOTHER.

* * * * *

[The MOTHER stands at the kitchen window, watching for Inge.]

MOTHER.  Ah, here she comes at last!

(Short pause.  Enter INGE.)

I have waited long for you, my child.  Where have you been?

(Inge is silent.)

Have you been to the Elf Hill?  Tell me.

INGE (hesitating).  Just for a little while, mother.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Children's Classics in Dramatic Form from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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