Sartor Resartus: the life and opinions of Herr Teufelsdrocke eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 238 pages of information about Sartor Resartus.

CHAPTER VII.  THE EVERLASTING NO.

Under the strange nebulous envelopment, wherein our Professor has now shrouded himself, no doubt but his spiritual nature is nevertheless progressive, and growing:  for how can the “Son of Time,” in any case, stand still?  We behold him, through those dim years, in a state of crisis, of transition:  his mad Pilgrimings, and general solution into aimless Discontinuity, what is all this but a mad Fermentation; wherefrom the fiercer it is, the clearer product will one day evolve itself?

Such transitions are ever full of pain:  thus the Eagle when he moults is sickly; and, to attain his new beak, must harshly dash off the old one upon rocks.  What Stoicism soever our Wanderer, in his individual acts and motions, may affect, it is clear that there is a hot fever of anarchy and misery raging within; coruscations of which flash out:  as, indeed, how could there be other?  Have we not seen him disappointed, bemocked of Destiny, through long years?  All that the young heart might desire and pray for has been denied; nay, as in the last worst instance, offered and then snatched away.  Ever an “excellent Passivity;” but of useful, reasonable Activity, essential to the former as Food to Hunger, nothing granted:  till at length, in this wild Pilgrimage, he must forcibly seize for himself an Activity, though useless, unreasonable.  Alas, his cup of bitterness, which had been filling drop by drop, ever since that first “ruddy morning” in the Hinterschlag Gymnasium, was at the very lip; and then with that poison-drop, of the Towgood-and-Blumine business, it runs over, and even hisses over in a deluge of foam.

He himself says once, with more justness than originality:  “Men is, properly speaking, based upon Hope, he has no other possession but Hope; this world of his is emphatically the Place of Hope.”  What, then, was our Professor’s possession?  We see him, for the present, quite shut out from Hope; looking not into the golden orient, but vaguely all round into a dim copper firmament, pregnant with earthquake and tornado.

Alas, shut out from Hope, in a deeper sense than we yet dream of!  For, as he wanders wearisomely through this world, he has now lost all tidings of another and higher.  Full of religion, or at least of religiosity, as our Friend has since exhibited himself, he hides not that, in those days, he was wholly irreligious:  “Doubt had darkened into Unbelief,” says he; “shade after shade goes grimly over your soul, till you have the fixed, starless, Tartarean black.”  To such readers as have reflected, what can be called reflecting, on man’s life, and happily discovered, in contradiction to much Profit-and-Loss Philosophy, speculative and practical, that Soul is not synonymous with Stomach; who understand, therefore, in our Friend’s words, “that, for man’s well-being, Faith is properly the one thing needful; how, with it, Martyrs,

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Sartor Resartus: the life and opinions of Herr Teufelsdrocke from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook