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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 238 pages of information about Sartor Resartus.

Our readers have witnessed the origin of this Love-mania, and with what royal splendor it waxes, and rises.  Let no one ask us to unfold the glories of its dominant state; much less the horrors of its almost instantaneous dissolution.  How from such inorganic masses, henceforth madder than ever, as lie in these Bags, can even fragments of a living delineation be organized?  Besides, of what profit were it?  We view, with a lively pleasure, the gay silk Montgolfier start from the ground, and shoot upwards, cleaving the liquid deeps, till it dwindle to a luminous star:  but what is there to look longer on, when once, by natural elasticity, or accident of fire, it has exploded?  A hapless air-navigator, plunging, amid torn parachutes, sand-bags, and confused wreck, fast enough into the jaws of the Devil!  Suffice it to know that Teufelsdrockh rose into the highest regions of the Empyrean, by a natural parabolic track, and returned thence in a quick perpendicular one.  For the rest, let any feeling reader, who has been unhappy enough to do the like, paint it out for himself:  considering only that if he, for his perhaps comparatively insignificant mistress, underwent such agonies and frenzies, what must Teufelsdrockh’s have been, with a fire-heart, and for a nonpareil Blumine!  We glance merely at the final scene:—­

“One morning, he found his Morning-star all dimmed and dusky-red; the fair creature was silent, absent, she seemed to have been weeping.  Alas, no longer a Morning-star, but a troublous skyey Portent, announcing that the Doomsday had dawned!  She said, in a tremulous voice, They were to meet no more.”  The thunder-struck Air-sailor is not wanting to himself in this dread hour:  but what avails it?  We omit the passionate expostulations, entreaties, indignations, since all was vain, and not even an explanation was conceded him; and hasten to the catastrophe. “‘Farewell, then, Madam!’ said he, not without sternness, for his stung pride helped him.  She put her hand in his, she looked in his face, tears started to her eyes; in wild audacity he clasped her to his bosom; their lips were joined, their two souls, like two dew-drops, rushed into one,—­for the first time and for the last!” Thus was Teufelsdrockh made immortal by a kiss.  And then?  Why, then—­“thick curtains of Night rushed over his soul, as rose the immeasurable Crash of Doom; and through the ruins as of a shivered Universe was he falling, falling, towards the Abyss.”

CHAPTER VI.  SORROWS OF TEUFELSDROCKH.

We have long felt that, with a man like our Professor, matters must often be expected to take a course of their own; that in so multiplex, intricate a nature, there might be channels, both for admitting and emitting, such as the Psychologist had seldom noted; in short, that on no grand occasion and convulsion, neither in the joy-storm nor in the woe-storm could you predict his demeanor.

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