Persuasion eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 249 pages of information about Persuasion.

Sir Walter could not have borne the degradation of being known to design letting his house.  Mr Shepherd had once mentioned the word “advertise,” but never dared approach it again.  Sir Walter spurned the idea of its being offered in any manner; forbad the slightest hint being dropped of his having such an intention; and it was only on the supposition of his being spontaneously solicited by some most unexceptionable applicant, on his own terms, and as a great favour, that he would let it at all.

How quick come the reasons for approving what we like!  Lady Russell had another excellent one at hand, for being extremely glad that Sir Walter and his family were to remove from the country.  Elizabeth had been lately forming an intimacy, which she wished to see interrupted.  It was with the daughter of Mr Shepherd, who had returned, after an unprosperous marriage, to her father’s house, with the additional burden of two children.  She was a clever young woman, who understood the art of pleasing—­the art of pleasing, at least, at Kellynch Hall; and who had made herself so acceptable to Miss Elliot, as to have been already staying there more than once, in spite of all that Lady Russell, who thought it a friendship quite out of place, could hint of caution and reserve.

Lady Russell, indeed, had scarcely any influence with Elizabeth, and seemed to love her, rather because she would love her, than because Elizabeth deserved it.  She had never received from her more than outward attention, nothing beyond the observances of complaisance; had never succeeded in any point which she wanted to carry, against previous inclination.  She had been repeatedly very earnest in trying to get Anne included in the visit to London, sensibly open to all the injustice and all the discredit of the selfish arrangements which shut her out, and on many lesser occasions had endeavoured to give Elizabeth the advantage of her own better judgement and experience; but always in vain:  Elizabeth would go her own way; and never had she pursued it in more decided opposition to Lady Russell than in this selection of Mrs Clay; turning from the society of so deserving a sister, to bestow her affection and confidence on one who ought to have been nothing to her but the object of distant civility.

From situation, Mrs Clay was, in Lady Russell’s estimate, a very unequal, and in her character she believed a very dangerous companion; and a removal that would leave Mrs Clay behind, and bring a choice of more suitable intimates within Miss Elliot’s reach, was therefore an object of first-rate importance.

Chapter 3

“I must take leave to observe, Sir Walter,” said Mr Shepherd one morning at Kellynch Hall, as he laid down the newspaper, “that the present juncture is much in our favour.  This peace will be turning all our rich naval officers ashore.  They will be all wanting a home.  Could not be a better time, Sir Walter, for having a choice of tenants, very responsible tenants.  Many a noble fortune has been made during the war.  If a rich admiral were to come in our way, Sir Walter—­”

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Persuasion from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.