Persuasion eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 249 pages of information about Persuasion.

A day or two passed without producing anything.  The theatre or the rooms, where he was most likely to be, were not fashionable enough for the Elliots, whose evening amusements were solely in the elegant stupidity of private parties, in which they were getting more and more engaged; and Anne, wearied of such a state of stagnation, sick of knowing nothing, and fancying herself stronger because her strength was not tried, was quite impatient for the concert evening.  It was a concert for the benefit of a person patronised by Lady Dalrymple.  Of course they must attend.  It was really expected to be a good one, and Captain Wentworth was very fond of music.  If she could only have a few minutes conversation with him again, she fancied she should be satisfied; and as to the power of addressing him, she felt all over courage if the opportunity occurred.  Elizabeth had turned from him, Lady Russell overlooked him; her nerves were strengthened by these circumstances; she felt that she owed him attention.

She had once partly promised Mrs Smith to spend the evening with her; but in a short hurried call she excused herself and put it off, with the more decided promise of a longer visit on the morrow.  Mrs Smith gave a most good-humoured acquiescence.

“By all means,” said she; “only tell me all about it, when you do come.  Who is your party?”

Anne named them all.  Mrs Smith made no reply; but when she was leaving her said, and with an expression half serious, half arch, “Well, I heartily wish your concert may answer; and do not fail me to-morrow if you can come; for I begin to have a foreboding that I may not have many more visits from you.”

Anne was startled and confused; but after standing in a moment’s suspense, was obliged, and not sorry to be obliged, to hurry away.

Chapter 20

Sir Walter, his two daughters, and Mrs Clay, were the earliest of all their party at the rooms in the evening; and as Lady Dalrymple must be waited for, they took their station by one of the fires in the Octagon Room.  But hardly were they so settled, when the door opened again, and Captain Wentworth walked in alone.  Anne was the nearest to him, and making yet a little advance, she instantly spoke.  He was preparing only to bow and pass on, but her gentle “How do you do?” brought him out of the straight line to stand near her, and make enquiries in return, in spite of the formidable father and sister in the back ground.  Their being in the back ground was a support to Anne; she knew nothing of their looks, and felt equal to everything which she believed right to be done.

While they were speaking, a whispering between her father and Elizabeth caught her ear.  She could not distinguish, but she must guess the subject; and on Captain Wentworth’s making a distant bow, she comprehended that her father had judged so well as to give him that simple acknowledgement of acquaintance, and she was just in time by a side glance to see a slight curtsey from Elizabeth herself.  This, though late, and reluctant, and ungracious, was yet better than nothing, and her spirits improved.

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Persuasion from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.