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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 220 pages of information about The Cinema Murder.

Title:  The Cinema Murder

Author:  E. Phillips Oppenheim

Release Date:  December 3, 2003 [EBook #10371]

Language:  English

Character set encoding:  ASCII

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Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Mary Meehan and the Online Distributed
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THE CINEMA MURDER

BY E. PHILLIPS OPPENHEIM

1917

BOOK I

CHAPTER I

With a somewhat prolonged grinding of the brakes and an unnecessary amount of fuss in the way of letting off steam, the afternoon train from London came to a standstill in the station at Detton Magna.  An elderly porter, putting on his coat as he came, issued, with the dogged aid of one bound by custom to perform a hopeless mission, from the small, redbrick lamp room.  The station master, occupying a position of vantage in front of the shed which enclosed the booking office, looked up and down the lifeless row of closed and streaming windows, with an expectancy dulled by daily disappointment, for the passengers who seldom alighted.  On this occasion no records were broken.  A solitary young man stepped out on to the wet and flinty platform, handed over the half of a third-class return ticket from London, passed through the two open doors and commenced to climb the long ascent which led into the town.

He wore no overcoat, and for protection against the inclement weather he was able only to turn up the collar of his well-worn blue serge coat.  The damp of a ceaselessly wet day seemed to have laid its cheerless pall upon the whole exceedingly ugly landscape.  The hedges, blackened with smuts from the colliery on the other side of the slope, were dripping also with raindrops.  The road, flinty and light grey in colour, was greasy with repellent-looking mud—­there were puddles even in the asphalt-covered pathway which he trod.  On either side of him stretched the shrunken, unpastoral-looking fields of an industrial neighbourhood.  The town-village which stretched up the hillside before him presented scarcely a single redeeming feature.  The small, grey stone houses, hard and unadorned, were interrupted at intervals by rows of brand-new, red-brick cottages.  In the background were the tall chimneys of several factories; on the left, a colliery shaft raised its smoke-blackened finger to the lowering clouds.

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