Memoir and Diary of John Yeardley, Minister of the Gospel eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 440 pages of information about Memoir and Diary of John Yeardley, Minister of the Gospel.

The next day was First-day; the parting with their Neufchatel friends was very affecting.

11 mo. 30.—­A precious meeting this morning.  The presence of Him who died for us was near, to help and comfort us; our hearts were much tendered by his divine love.  The taking leave of our dear friends here was almost heartrending.  There is a precious seed in this place, which I trust, is a little deeper rooted since our last visit, and it is the prayer of my heart, that the Saviour may water and watch over it, and that it may produce abundance of fruit to his praise.

They took their departure on the 2nd of the Twelfth Month, and arrived in London on the 13th, travelling through the north of France twelve days and six nights.

Through divine mercy we arrived safe in London, on Seventh-day evening, and lodged with our beloved relations at Highbury, who received us with all possible affection.  Our spirits on meeting, mingled in silent sorrow, while we were enabled to rejoice in God our Saviour.  On First-day morning we went over to Stamford-hill, and soon were introduced to our beloved brother, who was perfectly sensible, but extremely weak.  The peace and serenity which we were favored to feel by him was an inexpressible comfort to our sorrowful hearts.

A.B.  Savory died the next Third-day evening, and his remains were interred on the First-day following.

21_st_.—­This was the day fixed for the solemn occasion of accompanying the remains to the tomb.  The body was taken into the meeting-house at Newington, and the company of mourners and all present were, I believe, comforted and edified through the tender mercies of our Heavenly Father.  J.J.  Gurney’s communication was particularly precious; he also paid a consoling visit to the family after dinner.

We shall conclude this chapter with some reflections made by John Yeardley, on reviewing the changes which death had produced in the circle of his relations:—­

1835. 1 mo. 31.—­Waking this morning, I took a view of the great ravages death had made in our families; when this exhortation pressed suddenly and with peculiar force on my heart,—­Be thou also ready.  My soul responded, Thou Lord, alone, canst make me ready.  O gracious Saviour, who died for me, be pleased to redeem me from the bond of corruption, and purify my heart from earthly things.

CHAPTER XIV.

FROM THE END OF THE THIRD CONTINENTAL JOURNEY, IN 1834, TO THE COMMENCEMENT OF THE FOURTH, IN 1842.

During the seven years comprised in this chapter, the materials which exist for delineating John and Martha Yeardley’s history are meagre.  Of the numerous journeys which they made in the course of this period, the record kept by the former frequently consists of a mere itinerary.

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Memoir and Diary of John Yeardley, Minister of the Gospel from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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