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The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb — Volume 2 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 567 pages of information about The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb Volume 2.
Humphreys, Mr. Deputy, 253. 
Hunt, Leigh, and Lamb, 360.
——­ chaffed by Lamb, 364. 
Hunt, Leigh, replies to Lamb, 365.
——­ and Lamb’s “Chimney Sweepers,” 392.
——­ on Lamb’s books, 412.
——­ his translation of Milton, 426. 
—­ Thornton, 77, 372. 
Hutchinson, Sarah, Lamb’s letter to, 417.

I

I can remember when a child the maids, 372.
I have not forgot how thou didst love thy Charles, 350. 
Illusion on the stage, 185. 
Imagination, its lack in the artists of Lamb’s day, 256. 
Imitators of Lamb, 339. 
IMPERFECT SYMPATHIES, 66, 370. 
Ino Leucothea, 79. 
Ireland, Dean, 423. 
Irving, Edward, and Lamb, 442. 
Isola, Emma, 436.

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JACKSON, CAPTAIN, 215, 416. 
—­ “Omniscient,” 102, 383. 
“Janus Weathercock.” See Wainewright. 
Jekyll, Joseph, 97, 379.
John Woodvil quoted, 368, 372. 
Johnson, Dr. Samuel, 250, 344, 383. 
Jokes to order, Lamb on, 252. 
Jonson, Ben, quoted, 89. 
Jordan, Mrs., 151, 398. 
Joshua, Martin’s picture of, 262, 435. 
Journalism and Lamb, 251.

K

Kelly, Fanny, and BARBARA S——­, 421.
——­ and Mrs. Siddons, 422. 
Kemble, John Philip, 153, 168, 327, 398. 
Kenney, James, 30, 357. 
Kent, Charles, his edition of Lamb, 421. 
King, Thomas, 166, 400.

L

“Lady of the Manor,” 113, 387.  Lamb, Charles, on the South-Sea House, 1. ——­ on accountants, 3. ——­ on Elia, 8. ——­ on Oxford, 10. ——­ on antiquity, 11. ——­ on old libraries, 11. ——­ on George Dyer, 11. ——­ on his school-days, 14. ——­ on Coleridge’s school-days, 14. ——­ on Matthew Fielde, 21. ——­ on James Boyer, 22. ——­ on borrowers and borrowing, 26. ——­ on John Fenwick, 27. ——­ on Coleridge as a book borrower, 29. ——­ on the Duchess of Newcastle, 30. ——­ on the New Year, 31. ——­ on bells, 31. ——­ on his childhood, 32, 75. ——­ on the joy of life, 33. ——­ on death, 34. ——­ on Mrs. Battle and whist, 37, ——­ his want of ear, 43. ——­ his piano playing, 44. ——­ on oratorios, 45. ——­ on Novello’s evenings, 47. ——­ on fools, 48. ——­ on Quakers, 51, 55, 72. ——­ on silence, 51. ——­ on Sewel’s History, 53. ——­ on John Woolman, 54. ——­ and the Quaker “wit,” 55. ——­ his reading, 56. ——­ on schoolmasters, 59. ——­ on Valentine’s Day, 63. ——­ on anatomy and love, 64. ——­ on door knocks, 64. ——­ on Edward Burney’s valentine, 65. ——­ on imperfect sympathies, 66. ——­ on Scotchmen, 67. ——­ on Jews, 70. ——­ on Braham, 71. ——­ on negroes, 71. ——­ on Quakers, 72. ——­ on witches, 74. ——­ on his childhood, 75. ——­ on children and the dark, 77. ——­ on Thornton Hunt’s bringing up, 77. ——­ on dreams, 79. ——­ on his relations, 80. ——­ on Sarah Lamb, 80. ——­ on John Lamb, jr., 81, 117. ——­ on

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