Verse and Prose for Beginners in Reading eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 37 pages of information about Verse and Prose for Beginners in Reading.

THE TABLE AND THE CHAIR.

Said the Table to the Chair,
“You can hardly be aware
How I suffer from the heat
And from chilblains on my feet. 
If we took a little walk,
We might have a little talk;
Pray let us take the air,”
Said the Table to the Chair.

Said the Chair unto the Table,
“Now, you know we are not able: 
How foolishly you talk,
When you know we cannot walk!”
Said the Table with a sigh,
“It can do no harm to try. 
I’ve as many legs as you: 
Why can’t we walk on two?”

So they both went slowly down,
And walked about the town
With a cheerful bumpy sound
As they toddled round and round;
And everybody cried,
As they hastened to their side,
“See! the Table and the Chair
Have come out to take the air!”
But in going down an alley,
To a castle in a valley,
They completely lost their way,
And wandered all the day;
Till, to see them safely back,
They paid a Ducky-quack,
And a Beetle, and a Mouse,
Who took them to their house.

Then they whispered to each other. 
“O delightful little brother,
What a lovely walk we’ve taken! 
Let us dine on beans and bacon.” 
So the Ducky and the leetle
Browny-Mousy and the Beetle
Dined, and danced upon their heads
Till they toddled to their beds.

THE OWL.

I.

When cats run home and the light is come
  And dew is cold upon the ground,
And the far-off stream is dumb,
  And the whirring sail goes round,
  And the whirring sail goes round;
    Alone and warming his five wits,
    The white owl in the belfry sits.

II.

When merry milkmaids click the latch,
  And rarely smells the new-mown hay,
And the cock hath sung beneath the thatch
  Twice or thrice his roundelay,
  Twice or thrice his roundelay;
    Alone and warming his five wits,
    The white owl in the belfry sits.

THE OWL THE PUSSY-CAT.

The Owl and the Pussy-Cat went to sea
  In a beautiful pea-green boat: 
They took some honey and plenty of money
  Wrapped up In a five-pound note. 
The Owl looked up to the stars above,
  And sang to a small guitar,
“O lovely Pussy, O Pussy, my love,
  What a beautiful Pussy you are,
    You are,
    You are! 
  What a beautiful Pussy you are!”

Pussy said to the Owl, “You elegant fowl,
  How charmingly sweet you sing! 
Oh, let us be married; too long we have tarried: 
  But what shall we do for a ring?”
They sailed away, for a year and a day,
  To the land where the bong-tree grows;
And there in a wood a Piggy-wig stood,
  With a ring at the end of his nose,
    His nose,
    His nose,
  With a ring at the end of his nose.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Verse and Prose for Beginners in Reading from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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