The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth — Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 540 pages of information about The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth — Volume 1.

From 1815 to 1843, both poems were placed by Wordsworth among those “of Sentiment and Reflection.”  In 1845 they were transferred to “Poems written in Youth.”—­Ed.

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THE POEM

  How richly glows the water’s breast
  Before us, tinged with evening hues, [1]
  While, facing thus the crimson west,
  The boat her silent course [2] pursues! 
  And see how dark the backward stream! 5
  A little moment past so smiling! 
  And still, perhaps, with faithless gleam,
  Some other loiterers [3] beguiling.

  Such views the youthful Bard allure;
  But, heedless of the following gloom, 10
  He deems their colours shall endure
  Till peace go with him to the tomb. 
 —­And let him nurse his fond deceit,
  And what if he must die in sorrow! 
  Who would not cherish dreams so sweet, 15
  Though grief and pain may come to-morrow?

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VARIANTS ON THE TEXT

[Variant 1: 

1815.

    How rich the wave, in front, imprest
    With evening-twilight’s summer hues, 1798.]

[Variant 2: 

1802.

    ... path ... 1798.]

[Variant 3: 

1815.

    ... loiterer ... 1798.]

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REMEMBRANCE OF COLLINS

COMPOSED UPON THE THAMES NEAR RICHMOND [A]

Composed 1789.—­Published 1798

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  Glide gently, thus for ever glide,[B]
  O Thames! that other bards may see
  As lovely visions by thy side
  As now, fair river! come to me. 
  O glide, fair stream! for ever so, 5
  Thy quiet soul on all bestowing,
  Till all our minds for ever flow
  As thy deep waters now are flowing.

  Vain thought!—­Yet be as now thou art,
  That in thy waters may be seen 10
  The image of a poet’s heart,
  How bright, how solemn, how serene! 
  Such as did once the Poet bless, [1]
  Who murmuring here a later [C] ditty, [2]
  Could find no refuge from distress 15
  But in the milder grief of pity.

  Now let us, as we float along, [3]
  For him [4] suspend the dashing oar; [D]
  And pray that never child of song
  May know that Poet’s sorrows more. [5] 20
  How calm! how still! the only sound,
  The dripping of the oar suspended! 
 —­The evening darkness gathers round
  By virtue’s holiest Powers attended.

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The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth — Volume 1 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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