The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth — Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 540 pages of information about The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth — Volume 1.

  “Think you, ’mid all this mighty sum 25
  Of things for ever speaking,
  That nothing of itself will come,
  But we must still be seeking?

“—­Then ask not wherefore, here, alone, Conversing as I may, 30 I sit upon this old grey stone, And dream my time away.”

* * * * *

FOOTNOTE ON THE TEXT

[Footnote A:  In his “Advertisement” to the first edition of “Lyrical Ballads” (1798) Wordsworth writes,

  “The lines entitled ‘Expostulation and Reply’, and those which follow,
  arose out of conversation with a friend who was somewhat unreasonably
  attached to modern books of Moral Philosophy.”

Was the friend Sir James Mackintosh? or was it—­a much more probable supposition—­his friend, S. T. Coleridge?—­Ed.]

* * * * *

THE TABLES TURNED

AN EVENING SCENE ON THE SAME SUBJECT

Composed 1798.—­Published 1798

Included among the “Poems of Sentiment and Reflection.”—­Ed.

* * * * *

THE POEM

  Up! up! my Friend, and quit your books;
  Or surely you’ll grow double: 
  Up! up! my Friend, and clear your looks;
  Why all this toil and trouble? [1]

  The sun, above the mountain’s head, 5
  A freshening lustre mellow
  Through all the long green fields has spread,
  His first sweet evening yellow.

  Books! ’tis a dull and endless strife: 
  Come, hear the woodland linnet, 10
  How sweet his music! on my life,
  There’s more of wisdom in it.

  And hark! how blithe the throstle sings! 
  He, too, is [2] no mean preacher: 
  Come forth into the light of things, 15
  Let Nature be your Teacher.

  She has a world of ready wealth,
  Our minds and hearts to bless—­
  Spontaneous wisdom breathed by health,
  Truth breathed by cheerfulness. 20

  One impulse from a vernal wood
  May teach you more of man,
  Of moral evil and of good,
  Than all the sages can. [A]

  Sweet is the lore which Nature brings; 25
  Our meddling intellect
  Mis-shapes the beauteous forms of things:—­
  We murder to dissect.

  Enough of Science and of Art;
  Close up those [3] barren leaves; 30
  Come forth, and bring with you a heart
  That watches and receives.

* * * * *

VARIANTS ON THE TEXT

[Variant 1: 

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth — Volume 1 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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